H2Ohio

lake erie
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is spending nearly $200 million to improve and protect Ohio's water quality.

Gov. Mike DeWine encouraged a large group of farmers to keep participating in the program, saying they have a specific indicator to determine if their plan is reducing harmful algal blooms. 

DeWine urged the legislature to make a long-term investment into water quality efforts.

The end result was the H2Ohio collaborative which included $172 million in resources and aid.

The Ohio Farm Bureau is closing the book on its 100th year and looking to the next century as it hosts its two-day annual meeting in Columbus. 

photo of DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine has released details of his plan to improve water quality in Ohio, starting with preventing toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie. DeWine says the program will start in the Maumee River watershed near Toledo but he wants to eventually broaden it to the rest of the state. 

 

a photo of Lake Erie shoreline
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Now that the budget is signed, Gov. Mike DeWine said he’s already thinking about how to pay for water quality in Lake Erie after that two-year budget cycle ends.

DeWine wanted to front-load funding for clean Lake Erie initiatives by creating the H2Ohio Fund and putting $900 million in for the next decade.

Instead, lawmakers put $172 million in for the next two years. DeWine said he wants to take any surplus funds, which have been going to the state’s rainy day fund, and put those funds towards Lake Erie.

Photo of Lake Erie
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, June 24: