Guns

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Gov. Mike DeWine’s package of proposals to reduce gun violence through mental health and gun policy changes is getting mixed reviews. 

House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) says the so-called STRONG Ohio plan is weak, especially since it doesn’t include required background checks, which DeWine said early on he wanted and which Democrats have been pushing for.

“It makes it much harder for people in our caucus to get behind something that we don’t quite see as legitimate and strong and what people have requested from us,” Sykes said. 

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are the morning headlines for Monday, Oct. 7:

photo of Tim Ryan, Ray Mancini
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 29:

Photo of Cuyahoga River
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 11:

gun and bullets
KIATTIPONG / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Feb. 18:

Over the years, Kasich has brought forward a lot of ideas, and his tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise - with mixed results.

photo of Jim Renacci, Sherrod Brown
C-SPAN

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 22:

Photo of the Ford Plant.
GOOGLE EARTH

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, October 19:

Photo of police standing off with protestors
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, October 9:

photo of DeWine and Cordray
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Rich Cordray went head-to-head in their first debate in the race for governor. The two traded jabs in what escalated into a heated debate over their records.

DeWine didn’t pull any punches against Cordray.

“You know Richard you’re all talk, and you do nothing. You’ve been a failure in every job you’ve ever had,” DeWine said.

And Cordray came out swinging from the start.

“He believes that after 42 years in office, he’s entitled to be governor,” Cordray fired back.

photo of Speaker Ryan Smith
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill is likely to come to the floor of the House next week, just before lawmakers leave for an extended break. That might not be the end of the road for that controversial measure.

The Stand Your Ground bill came out of a House committee last month on a party line vote. New Speaker Ryan Smith leads a Republican supermajority in the House, and says, “I feel comfortable in saying that there's a lot of support for that bill.”

Open Carry Demonstrators
Andrew Atkins / WKSU

About 70 demonstrators gathered in Kent State University’s Risman Plaza Friday carrying handguns and rifles or wearing holsters.

While visitors can bring guns on campus, students and staff cannot.

The event was organized by senior biology major Kaitlin Bennett and Cincinnati-area accountant Jeffry Smith, who has held similar open-carry demonstrations at the University of Akron and other sites around the state.

Bennet says they were there to spark conversation.
 

Photo of Niraj Antani
TWITTER

Amid the debate over whether teachers should be armed in schools, a Dayton-area lawmaker says he believes some students could carry weapons as well.

Conservative Republican Rep. Niraj Antani says this came about because of a question from his Democratic opponent on Twitter.

“This is my belief – that any law abiding person who is of age should be able to carry a firearm anywhere in a public place to protect themselves. And I also further believe that gun-free zones don’t work.”

Richard Cordray
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

One of the leading Democratic candidates for governor – who has earned top ratings from the NRA and state gun groups – laid out his gun platform today. It includes universal background checks, a crackdown on illegal gun purchases and a ban on bump stocks. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, Richard Cordray also took a tentative step toward restricting assault-style weapons.

A photo of Chief Mark Brink and Superintendent Christopher DiLoreto.
WKYC / WKYC

Authorities in Stark County have released some additional details on the shooting at Jackson Middle School this morning. 

Jackson Township Police Chief Mark Brink says a seventh-grade student shot himself in a school restroom. The chief says the unidentified student was carrying a long gun and “distractionary devices.”

Brink says the student was taken to the hospital by the fire department. It is unclear where he shot himself. No one else was injured.

Seven Charged in Gun-Running from Ohio to New Jersey

Feb 15, 2018
chart of gun-running ring
JOE HERNANDEZ / WHYY

Law enforcement officials in New Jersey say a group of seven men bought guns in Ohio and drove them to Camden, where they sold them on the street.

As WHYY's Joe Hernandez reports, the defendants are facing racketeering charges.

The alleged leader of this ring was 25-year-old Chucky Scott of Columbus. Officials say he picked out guns in stores and online, had a friend buy them and then drove the guns to Camden where he had a handful of men would resell them.

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 23rd:

photo of gun-free zone
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill is moving through the Ohio House that would let off duty police officers carry weapons into gun-free zones. This bill has the support of police officers.

The Ohio Fraternal Order of Police says officers always have a responsibility to take action whether they’re on duty or not. And the union is advocating for a bill it says will help protect gun-free zones from attackers.

Opponents say the proposal violates the rights of property owners who make the decision to restrict guns.

photo of gun buyback
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Cleveland Police Department collected 168 firearms during its gun buyback yesterday, with people lining up almost an hour in advance for the annual event.

The 10th annual buyback allowed anyone to turn in a working handgun or semi-automatic rifle -- no questions asked -- for up to $200 in gift cards.

photo of concealed carry
SHUTTERSTOCK

A bill that allows people to carry guns into more areas such as day cares and college campuses is moving through the legislature as the current session draws to a close.

There’s a list of places that where people are automatically banned from carrying concealed weapons. That includes day cares, airport terminals and government buildings. But a bill moving closer to becoming a law would cross those three places off the list, with some exceptions.

Chief Calvin Williams
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

Cleveland police are prepared to handle members of the New Black Panthers Party who say they will be in town this week carrying guns to protect protesters. The group plans to be at “Black Lives Matter” demonstrations leading up to next week’s Republican National Convention.

Group painting Kent State rock orange for gun violence awareness
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

Nearly 200 events are taking place nationwide today to mark “National Gun Violence Awareness Day.”

Part of the campaign is encouraging people to wear orange, the color hunters wear to help prevent them from being shot. The Portage and Summit County Chapter of “Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America” spray painted a huge rock orange on the Kent State campus.

WKSU

There are two brands of handguns that look virtually identical side-by-side but there’s a big difference: one fires bullets and the other fires BB’s. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports -- lawmakers say this can cause confusion and tragic results.

A man named Mike is holding what looks like a black, Glock 19 handgun and he’s reviewing its features on YouTube.

“Some of the things that I like about this gun are the facts that it has blowback; it has the ejection port that’s open.”

CUYAHOGA COUNTY

 The Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court is taking a tougher stand against children under its supervision who possess realistic-looking fake guns.  An initiative begins this Friday that could take some freedoms away from offenders caught with facsimiles. WKSU’s Kevin Niedermier reports.

Pages