gun laws

a photo of Rob Portman
WKSU

Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says he supports parts of Gov. Mike DeWine’s 17-point plan to curb gun violence in Ohio.

Portman says he thinks more needs to be done to make sure people with mental health problems are in the federal background check system to flag gun purchases.

“I think we can do more to tighten that up and my understanding is the president and others are willing to work on this together because if it’s not bipartisan, it’s not going to happen.”

A photo of quarterback Baker Mayfield and Cleveland Browns
ERIK DROST / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 23:

photo of Speaker Ryan Smith
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill is likely to come to the floor of the House next week, just before lawmakers leave for an extended break. That might not be the end of the road for that controversial measure.

The Stand Your Ground bill came out of a House committee last month on a party line vote. New Speaker Ryan Smith leads a Republican supermajority in the House, and says, “I feel comfortable in saying that there's a lot of support for that bill.”

photo of Kasich, Rosenberger and Obhof
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has been urging lawmakers to pass a bill that would put a red-flag law in place to prevent people deemed dangerous by a court from buying guns. It would also ban bump stock attachments for guns and make other reforms. But despite the Republican governor's support, it appears it won’t be easy to get it passed through the GOP-dominated Legislature.

Ohio Students Prepare For More Walkouts Friday

Apr 19, 2018
Photo of students walking out after the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida
Nick Evans / WOSU NEWS

Ohio students are once again preparing to walk out of their classrooms in support of stricter gun laws.

The Friday walkouts, protests and marches will mark the 19th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting, where 13 people were killed.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This weekend brought huge protests over gun laws and another appearance by Gov. John Kasich on a Sunday morning national TV news show, talking about his recent and public change of heart on gun laws.

However, it’s still unclear whether recently discussed gun law changes will move forward with state lawmakers.

A photo of Cordray taking questions from reporters.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Several cities are considering legislation on guns if state lawmakers don’t pass their own changes – though a state law from a decade ago prevents them from passing stricter laws. The Democrat who argued for that law is now running for governor and is being asked about that.

In 2010, then-Attorney General Richard Cordray argued for the state law, which was upheld by the Ohio Supreme Court. Now as a candidate for governor, Cordray seems to imply there is daylight between that law and carefully drawn local ordinances.

Photo of House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The controversial “Stand Your Ground” bill has stalled in the Ohio House. The measure, which makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense, had its last hearing one day before the mass shooting in Parkland, Fla. Now, the House leader says it’s time to take a step back and look at the bigger picture on gun policies.

A photo of former U.S. Rep. Deborah Pryce (left), Jim Tobin of the Catholic Conference of Ohio, former state Rep. Ron Maag and former Senate president Tom Niehaus are members of Gov. John Kasich’s group, moderated by Public Safety director Col. John Born.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has put out a package of gun-law changes he hopes to get through the Republican-dominated state Legislature. This comes after several weeks of talking about a private group he convened to discuss gun laws, and after a very public pivot on gun regulations following last month’s Florida school shooting.

Stafanie Niles
DICKENSON COLLEGE

At least 14 Ohio colleges and universities have joined with more than 200 of their counterparts nationally, vowing to defend the admission of students who are disciplined for participating in peaceful protests.

High school walk outs started across the country after 17 teachers and students were killed during a Valentine’s Day shooting at their Florida high school. Many of the protests, including in Ohio, have called on Congress to pass stricter gun laws.

Richard Cordray
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

One of the leading Democratic candidates for governor – who has earned top ratings from the NRA and state gun groups – laid out his gun platform today. It includes universal background checks, a crackdown on illegal gun purchases and a ban on bump stocks. As WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, Richard Cordray also took a tentative step toward restricting assault-style weapons.

A photo of Senate President Larry Obhof.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are 22 bills related to guns pending in the Ohio Legislature right now. It’s hard to predict what might happen to them after the deadly Florida school shooting last week and Gov. John Kasich’s new willingness to embrace some gun regulations.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof isn’t saying what will happen with gun bills in the days following the deaths of 17 people at a high school in Florida. But he says lawmakers are considering ways to beef up security in Ohio’s schools.

photo of chart of run running ring
JOE HERNANDEZ / WHYY

Prosecutors in New Jersey are charging a group of seven men with buying guns in Ohio, driving them to Camden, and selling them illegally.

State and federal authorities seized 17 firearms as part of the operation, which pales in comparison to the thousands of guns taken during gun buybacks.

But New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal says these weapons run a higher risk of doing more harm.

Seven Charged in Gun-Running from Ohio to New Jersey

Feb 15, 2018
chart of gun-running ring
JOE HERNANDEZ / WHYY

Law enforcement officials in New Jersey say a group of seven men bought guns in Ohio and drove them to Camden, where they sold them on the street.

As WHYY's Joe Hernandez reports, the defendants are facing racketeering charges.

The alleged leader of this ring was 25-year-old Chucky Scott of Columbus. Officials say he picked out guns in stores and online, had a friend buy them and then drove the guns to Camden where he had a handful of men would resell them.

photo of Cliff Rosenberger and Fred Strahorn
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

In recent Sunday morning TV appearances and in a nationally distributed op-ed, Gov. John Kasich has advocated bringing both sides together to find common ground on guns. But had the leaders of the Ohio House spoken to Kasich about the issue?

The majority led by Republican House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger has pushed for expansion of gun owners’ rights. Rosenberger says he appreciates the governor’s approach to try to find something to agree on.

Picture of Sherrod Brown
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The White House has chided talk of gun control this week, claiming it’s too soon to talk about policy in the wake of the Vegas massacre. One top Democrat in Ohio says if not now, when?

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown is calling for a ban on "bump stocks", which can make semi-automatic rifles replicate fully automatics and may have been used by the Vegas gunman.

Brown says other issues should also be taken up, such as a federal waiting period and a gun buying ban for people on the terrorist watch.

Ohio gun laws
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A group advocating for gun control is planning to protest Wednesday at the Summit County Fair to try to stop the fairgrounds from being used throughout the year for private gun shows.

Summit County Progressive Democrats have been protesting at the fairgrounds for years, saying such shows around the nation facilitate sales of weapons to customers without background checks.

photo of gun-free zone
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people to carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones without being criminally liable.

The Republican-sponsored bill would let concealed-carry permit holders take their guns into gun-free zones including restaurants, schools and courthouses as long as they’re not caught. If they are caught and if they leave immediately, they won't face criminal charges.

Protest in Oberlin 2013
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Republican National Convention starts in just about two weeks  in Cleveland. The city has spent more than a year planning for security around the RNC. But it  has very little say about whether people can bring their guns to Cleveland. 

The city of Cleveland’s list of items banned from downtown during the convention includes tennis balls, grappling hooks and canned goods.

But not guns.

a photo of Rob Portman
WKSU

Ohio’s U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says he has not changed his position and continues to believe Republicans came up with the best plan to keep terrorists from getting guns. 

Portman said this week he believes there can be a bill both Republicans and Democrats would support to block people on the terrorist-watch and no-fly lists from legally buying guns. The Senate turned down two proposals to do that in December.

 Janine Boyd and Nickie Antonio
OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A northeast Ohio man accused of shooting and killing his wife and then himself had been ordered by a judge to stay away from her after threatening to kill her. Now some Democratic state lawmakers are urging passage of a bill they say would make it harder for people convicted of domestic violence to own guns.

Democratic Rep. Nickie Antonio of Lakewood says her proposal would force people convicted of domestic violence to turn their guns over to authorities.

Ohio gun laws
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

  President Obama’s executive orders on gun regulations have people on both sides of the issue asking about Ohio’s gun laws. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler has an overview.