Gov. Mike DeWine

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Gun control advocates see DeWine's proposals for a version of the "Red Flag Law" and expanded background checks as a good first step towards reducing gun violence.

And Kristine Woodworth with Moms Demand Action had a message for Ohio lawmakers who don't come to the table.

a photo of Peggy Lehner
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of a Republican legislator who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo. The proposed law allows courts to remove guns from someone deemed a potential threat to themselves or others.

Following the mass shooting in Dayton, State Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who represents areas around the city, said she will no longer be timid in her stance for "common sense" gun regulation.

a photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio's prescription drug reporting database is performing at a record high level. Gov. Mike DeWine says these new number show Ohio's tool is the most prolific of its kind in the country. 

The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System also known as OARRS is averaging more than 800,000 searches a day, even surpassing one million queries twice this year.

Physicians, hospitals, pharmacies, and other medical professionals use this database to search for patients' prescription drug histories.

Sage Lewis in the tent city
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 24:

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction, according to Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, who chairs an energy and water subcommittee in the U. S. House of Representatives.  

On Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine signed a $1 billion dollar bailout to help FirstEnergy Solutions continue to operate two nuclear plants in Ohio.

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 23:

photo of statehouse building
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After the House and Senate couldn’t agree on a new state budget, lawmakers operated on a temporary spending plan

Now that a permanent two-year budget is in place, agencies can operate with certainty and know the amount of money they have to do the business of the state.

But it doesn’t mean every item in the budget is in effect now. 

photo of Rep. Jim Butler
OHIO STATEHOUSE

Nearly half of the 25 vetoes that Gov. Mike DeWine issued when he signed the two-year state budget deal with health care and Medicaid, which is the state’s largest program. A member of the conference committee that worked on the compromise budget deal isn’t happy with those rejections.

a photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine said the state is keeping a close eye on the Cuyahoga County jail system and the problems it has had with inmate deaths and use of force. DeWine added that fixing those problems might require a bigger picture solution.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction is ramping up its jail inspection team by adding more inspectors, including a registered nurse.

Sherrod Brown at Ohio military installation
SHERROD BROWN STAFF / FACEBOOK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 15:

photo of Kimberly Murnieks, Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is entering week two of operations under a temporary budget plan after the Ohio House and Senate failed to reach a deal before the end of the fiscal year. Lawmakers said most Ohioans will continue business as usual, but state agencies have been directed to keep a close watch on their spending. 

Photo of abortion rights protestors
MALLORY BENEDICT / PBS NEWSHOUR CC FLICKR

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 25:

Photo of a soybean plant
NICK EVANS / WOSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, June 20:

Photo of Cuyahoga River
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 11:

photo of DeWine talking to media
JASON REYNOLDS / WYSO

Gov. Mike DeWine declared a state of emergency in three Ohio counties after spending the day surveying the damage left behind by tornadoes and severe storms. 

DeWine declared states of emergency for Greene, Mercer, and Montgomery counties. He flew over Beavercreek and Celina to look at the damage and went on the ground to see the path of destruction firsthand.

a view of the ceremony
SAM ABERLE / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This year’s Memorial Day wreath laying ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse was Gov. Mike DeWine’s first as Governor.

Jim Groves, whose son, U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer James Groves III, of Kettering, was killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in 2013 was on hand for the event.

So were state dignitaries, including Ohio Department of Veterans Services Director Deborah Ashenhurst, Secretary of State Frank LaRose and the Olentangy High School Choir.

a photo of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Plans are in the works to sell the former GM plant in Lordstown to a company that would build electric trucks there. GM CEO Mary Barra talked to Ohio Governor Mike DeWine about the sale of the plant that halted production earlier this year. 

Gov. Mike DeWine said he spoke with GM’s Mary Barra who confirmed the plant will be sold to Workhorse, a Cincinnati company. She said the sale will pave the way for hundreds of jobs. DeWine said the auto workers’ union will have to approve the deal.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lawmakers in the Ohio House are looking over revisions made to the state’s two-year budget bill. The new version made several amendments to Gov. Mike DeWine’s original plan. 

The House’ version of the budget created income tax cuts for low and moderate-income Ohioans and cut several tax credits.

Republican leaders also decided to take out Gov. Mike DeWine’s 10-year, $900 million clean Lake Erie fund and replace it with just $85 million for the next two years.

picture of DeWine at flag memorial
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine said he’s deeply concerned about attacks at houses of worship, including at a synagogue in California over the weekend. He's looking into a specific type of gun legislation that’s failed to move in the Republican dominated legislature before. 

pic of Jon Husted and Innovate Ohio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed an executive order that sets up a new information sharing platform for state agencies. 

Lt. Gov. and InnovateOhio Director Jon Husted said the executive order will put all the state’s agencies on the InnovateOhio Platform, a network that will allow agencies to access each other’s information all in one place.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers have been advised by their economic researchers to cut the spending in Gov. Mike DeWine’s budget. But they may try to add something that DeWine deliberately didn’t put in. It may appear in the House version of the budget, set to be released on Wednesday.

There have been tax cuts in nearly every state budget since 2005, and Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) said Republican lawmakers want to continue that, saying they’re why the state’s economy has been doing well the last few years.

photo of Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are debating a plan that would bail out the state’s two aging nuclear energy plants by charging customers more. Gov. Mike DeWine isn’t weighing in on that proposal, but he said nuclear energy needs to be a part of Ohio’s short-term energy landscape.

FirstEnergy Solutions has filed for bankruptcy, saying it needs state lawmakers to step in and pass a bailout of its nuclear power plants. DeWine said those two facilities are needed. 

photo of Gov. Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are no tax cuts in Gov. Mike DeWine’s first budget. Lawmakers may change that when they introduce their version of it soon. But they probably won’t change the $19.2 billion in tax credits and loopholes in it. Two politically opposite researchers are concerned about those tax breaks.

Pages