Gov. Mike DeWine

A stock photo of stethoscope and chart.
PIXABAY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Jan. 16:

a photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Governor Mike DeWine is still not talking about how he feels about impeachment proceedings against his fellow Republican, President Donald Trump.

DeWine was a Senator during the impeachment trial of President Clinton. DeWine said in September that he wanted to wait to see the evidence against Trump. He now said that it’s up to members of the House and Senate to decide on those two articles of impeachment.

“I’m not following it every day. I mean, I see it in the paper, I hear your reports. But my focus is on Ohio.”

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BEAURU

Gov. Mike DeWine says he wants to make it easier and quicker for people who have long-ago criminal convictions to be considered for pardons. It’s another part of his recent moves to make changes to Ohio’s parole and post-release system.

DeWine says he often sees pardon applications for murderers, rapists and other offenders.

"They got a snowball's chance in hell of getting granted, some of them," DeWine said. "And so they're kind of clogging the system, and the people who really should be applying aren’t applying."

Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

Lawmakers are preparing to have more hearings on a bill that makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense in a threatening situation. But Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the legislature to prioritize another bill before "Stand Your Ground." 

photo of DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine has released details of his plan to improve water quality in Ohio, starting with preventing toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie. DeWine says the program will start in the Maumee River watershed near Toledo but he wants to eventually broaden it to the rest of the state. 

 

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M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are the morning headlines for Monday, Oct. 7:

a photo of Rob Portman
WKSU

Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says he supports parts of Gov. Mike DeWine’s 17-point plan to curb gun violence in Ohio.

Portman says he thinks more needs to be done to make sure people with mental health problems are in the federal background check system to flag gun purchases.

“I think we can do more to tighten that up and my understanding is the president and others are willing to work on this together because if it’s not bipartisan, it’s not going to happen.”

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DAVID CARILLET / SHUTTERSTOCK

There’s an ongoing and uncivil war between many Republicans and Democrats. But two former Ohio governors have called a truce and created a friendship. And though they’re from different parties, Republican Bob Taft and Democrat Ted Strickland have a lot of views in common.

a photo of a hemp plant
TY HIGGINS / OHIO FARM BUREAU

The Ohio Farm Bureau is taking steps to prepare Ohio farmers to grow their first crop of hemp next spring now that Gov. Mike DeWine signed a law legalizing it.

The Farm Bureau is researching best practices for growing hemp. Spokesman Ty Higgins said hemp is a crop that can be grown anywhere in Ohio.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, August 21:

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Gun control advocates see DeWine's proposals for a version of the "Red Flag Law" and expanded background checks as a good first step towards reducing gun violence.

And Kristine Woodworth with Moms Demand Action had a message for Ohio lawmakers who don't come to the table.

a photo of Peggy Lehner
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of a Republican legislator who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo. The proposed law allows courts to remove guns from someone deemed a potential threat to themselves or others.

Following the mass shooting in Dayton, State Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who represents areas around the city, said she will no longer be timid in her stance for "common sense" gun regulation.

a photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio's prescription drug reporting database is performing at a record high level. Gov. Mike DeWine says these new number show Ohio's tool is the most prolific of its kind in the country. 

The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System also known as OARRS is averaging more than 800,000 searches a day, even surpassing one million queries twice this year.

Physicians, hospitals, pharmacies, and other medical professionals use this database to search for patients' prescription drug histories.

Sage Lewis in the tent city
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 24:

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction, according to Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, who chairs an energy and water subcommittee in the U. S. House of Representatives.  

On Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine signed a $1 billion dollar bailout to help FirstEnergy Solutions continue to operate two nuclear plants in Ohio.

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 23:

photo of statehouse building
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After the House and Senate couldn’t agree on a new state budget, lawmakers operated on a temporary spending plan

Now that a permanent two-year budget is in place, agencies can operate with certainty and know the amount of money they have to do the business of the state.

But it doesn’t mean every item in the budget is in effect now. 

photo of Rep. Jim Butler
OHIO STATEHOUSE

Nearly half of the 25 vetoes that Gov. Mike DeWine issued when he signed the two-year state budget deal with health care and Medicaid, which is the state’s largest program. A member of the conference committee that worked on the compromise budget deal isn’t happy with those rejections.

a photo of Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine said the state is keeping a close eye on the Cuyahoga County jail system and the problems it has had with inmate deaths and use of force. DeWine added that fixing those problems might require a bigger picture solution.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction is ramping up its jail inspection team by adding more inspectors, including a registered nurse.

Sherrod Brown at Ohio military installation
SHERROD BROWN STAFF / FACEBOOK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 15:

photo of Kimberly Murnieks, Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is entering week two of operations under a temporary budget plan after the Ohio House and Senate failed to reach a deal before the end of the fiscal year. Lawmakers said most Ohioans will continue business as usual, but state agencies have been directed to keep a close watch on their spending. 

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MALLORY BENEDICT / PBS NEWSHOUR CC FLICKR

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 25:

Photo of Cuyahoga River
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 11:

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