Glenn Starkman

NASA

We all enjoy the moon on a clear night, but what if it could do more for us?

Glenn Starkman, professor of physics at Case Western Reserve University wonders if the moon could be a detector for dark matter--the stuff that causes the extra gravity needed to hold galaxies together as they spin.

It turns out that finding it is….hard.

photo of spiral galaxy
NASA

Scientists talk a lot about dark matter. It sounds exciting, but what does it do for us?

"If the dark matter wasn't there, the galaxy should fly apart," Case Western Reserve University physics professor Glenn Starkman said.

Starkman chases dark matter for a living. Scientists started thinking about dark matter in the middle of the last century, when they looked at galaxies and saw something wasn't quite right.

LAURA GILCHRIST / FLICKR CC

Eight Nobel laureates are among the scientific luminaries gathering in Cleveland this weekend to celebrate the 50th anniversary of one of the most important theories in science.

The Standard Model of particle physics was proposed in the late 1960’s.