gerrymandering

Ohio's Congressional map based on the 2010 Census
SECRETARY OF STATE

In light of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on gerrymandering in two other states, voting-rights groups have revised their lawsuit over how Ohio draws its congressional maps. 

CLIFF ROSENBERGER
STATE OF OHIO

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 24:

Ohio's Congressional map based on the 2010 Census
SECRETARY OF STATE

Voters approved an overhaul of the way Ohio’s Congressional district map will be drawn in the future. But a lawsuit has been filed in federal court against the current map, which opponents say is a result of partisan gerrymandering.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Ohioans will vote May 8th on Issue 1, a plan to change the way Congressional districts are drawn in Ohio. 

The state is considered one of the most gerrymandered in the U.S. Issue 1 creates a bipartisan process for redrawing districts.

Catherine Turcer is executive director of Common Cause Ohio, one of the groups that, along with lawmakers, came up with the plan.

Photo of ACLU's Mike Brickner
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The May ballot issue that would change the process for drawing lines for congressional districts, is getting widespread bipartisan support from organizations and officials. But there’s one major group that isn’t going to back Issue 1.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio’s Mike Brickner says his group will not endorse it because it won’t prevent gerrymandering on Ohio’s Congressional map.

“It allows the process to devolve into just a single party voting and only getting one party’s approval of the maps," Brickner says. 

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