FirstEnergy Solutions

Davis Besse
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron-based FirstEnergy Solutions has filed for bankruptcy, just days after announcing it would close nuclear power plants in Ohio and Pennsylvania. WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia reports on legislation that could impact at least the plants in Ohio.

Davis Besse
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

EDITOR'S NOTE: This story originally misidentified the superintendent of Perry local Schools.  

FirstEnergy says it’s starting the process of shutting down its two nuclear power plants in northern Ohio, saying it can’t compete with lower natural gas prices. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the company says it’s willing to work with lawmakers to find ways to keep them operating.

photo of entrance to FirstEnergy Solutions' Perry Nuclear plant
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 29:

A vIew of downtown Akron from Knight Center
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 9:

photo of judge gavel
ESB PROFESSIONAL / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 8:

Davis Besse
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Correction:  This article originally included a story referencing the executive director of the Greater Cleveland RTA.  The person in the story is actually executive director of Akron Metro RTA.

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Jan. 26:

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Jan. 24:

Bill Seitz
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Ohio lawmakers have tabled a plan to add a fee to the electric bills of FirstEnergy customers to help pay for the utility’s unprofitable nuclear plants.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that a key legislator is floating an alternative solution.

FirstEnergy says it needs the $300 million per year generated by a customer fee it's proposing to keep its two Ohio nuclear plants operating, Davis-Besse near Toledo and Perry east of Cleveland. 

First Energy Headquarters
Tim Rudell / WKSU

FirstEnergy is considering moving away from its competitive-market power-generation businesses and back to being a fully regulated utility.  Could such a change make the Akron-based Corporation vulnerable to a takeover?  

Probably not, says Barry Abramson, a senior analyst with Saber Partners energy industry consulting firm in New York. 

DAVID OHMER / FLICKR CC

One week after a surprise split with its major electricity supplier, a non-profit energy aggregator serving half-a-million Ohioans says it’s found a replacement.

The Northeast Ohio Public Energy Council or NOPEC negotiates discounted energy contracts for 200 communities across 13 Northern Ohio counties.

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