FirstEnergy

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Corporations are seeing big savings as the effects of the large federal tax cut take place. Now state energy regulators want to see if Ohio’s major utilities are going to pass those savings on to the ratepayers. It’s unknown whether the corporation tax cuts will result in lower electric bills.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has opened up hearings to find out if utilities should decrease electric bills based on the money they’re getting from the big corporate tax cut.

First Energy downtown Akron
Tim Rudell / WKSU

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

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Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Jan. 29:

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

 

Big changes are coming to one of Akron’s largest employers. FirstEnergy may soon separate itself from its power generating business. Chief Financial Officer, Jim Pearson talks about what’s ahead.

 

Davis Besse
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Correction:  This article originally included a story referencing the executive director of the Greater Cleveland RTA.  The person in the story is actually executive director of Akron Metro RTA.

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Ohio EPA

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First Energy Bulding
Tim Rudell / WKSU

EDITOR'S NOTE: The name of FirstEnergy's spokeswoman was misspelled in this story and has been corrected. 

FirstEnergy just got a $2.5 billion financial boost in its struggle to transition back to a fully regulated utility. Three large investment firms are buying about a 16 percent equity stake in the Akron-based energy company. 

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THE CORNER ALLEY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Jan. 16:

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FIRSTENERGY

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Jan. 10:

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JAMES KELLY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Ohio utilities are considering their next steps after federal regulators knocked down a measure that would have allowed subsidies for struggling power plants. But, there are still options from state lawmakers.

The proposal would have allowed utilities to charge their customers an extra fee to help prop up power plants that struggle to compete in the market. But the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied the measure.

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Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Jan. 9:

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WIKIMEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, December 5th:

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FIRSTENERGY CORP.

FirstEnergy is offering to pay tuition and fees for some students to attend Stark State College, if they’re interested in working with electricity – outdoors.

The company’s Power Systems Institute is a two-year program at several community colleges, including Stark State. The training could lead to work with the utility company as line workers or at a substation, which can often be in tight spaces, or it can involve being high up on steel structures.

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The Akron-based utility, FirstEnergy, has introduced an online retail outlet for its customers.

FirstEnergy’s Smart-Mart.com sells energy-saving lightbulbs, internet-enabled accessories and home improvement services.

Company spokesman Aaron Ruegg says the goal is to build a relationship with customers beyond the electric bill.

Davis Besse
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Another clash may be coming between Republican state lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich. It’s over a bill on nuclear power plants, but the issue may be more about money.

At the opening of a new natural gas plant this week in Toledo, Kasich said he can’t support a bill that would allow FirstEnergy to charge its customers more to subsidize its two aging nuclear plants.

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OHIO SENATE

Leaders in the House and Senate are on the brink of approving a provision that would allow power companies to add another fee to your electric bill. The idea is to boost the utilities’ credit ratings.

The line item in the budget would give the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio the authority to allow price hikes in order to raise a utility’s credit rating.

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JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years.

Customers could see additional fees on their electric bills to help prop up the struggling Ohio Valley Electric Corporation, a coal plant commonly known as OVEC.

Bill Seitz
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Ohio lawmakers have tabled a plan to add a fee to the electric bills of FirstEnergy customers to help pay for the utility’s unprofitable nuclear plants.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that a key legislator is floating an alternative solution.

FirstEnergy says it needs the $300 million per year generated by a customer fee it's proposing to keep its two Ohio nuclear plants operating, Davis-Besse near Toledo and Perry east of Cleveland. 

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The CEO of one of Ohio’s largest energy providers made a rare appearance before state lawmakers, pleading for nuclear plant subsidies. This push comes as the company is nearing a major decision.

FirstEnergy CEO Chuck Jones went before the Ohio Senate, saying subsidies would prop up their two struggling nuclear plants. If passed, FirstEnergy customers would see about a $5 increase to their monthly electric bills.

photo of Perry Nuclear Plant
JERRY SHARP / SHUTTERSTOCK

The proposals at the Statehouse to subsidize FirstEnergy’s two nuclear plants are getting some pushback from about 40 different entities in Ohio.

The Coalition Against Nuclear Bailouts has bipartisan support from elected officials, pastors and even organizations like AARP and the Ohio Coin Machine Association.

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