fentanyl

photo of Southern Ohio Correctional Facility Lucasville
DAN KONIK

The refusal of pharmaceutical companies to sell the state drugs to use in executions has capital punishment at a virtual standstill in Ohio. Now, a state lawmaker has proposed using a deadly drug seized by police to continue to carry out the death penalty.

Mount Carmel Health System announced Thursday that CEO Ed Lamb will resign at the end of the month, following an investigation into "excessive" painkiller dosing by a former doctor. The hospital also fired 23 employees, including five members of the management team, involved in the cases.

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QUINN DOMBROWSKI / FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 9: 

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KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 30:

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ODOT-DAYTON TWITTER (@ODOT_Dayton)

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 29: 

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GINO SANTO MARIA / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 24: 

A new report out of the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring (OSAM) Network finds that while opioid prescriptions are falling throughout Ohio, methamphetamine remains widely available in the state. In the Cleveland area, powdered cocaine and meth are becoming more available, and the number of clients entering treatment for meth use increased.

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 5:

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WKSU

Voters in Ohio will see one statewide issue on the ballot. Supporters have said this constitutional amendment will steer non-violent drug offenders away from prison and into treatment. But opponents claim it will dismantle the work Ohio has already done to curb the opioid epidemic.

OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, October 5:

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A recent analysis of state data shows opioid overdose deaths increased by another 20 percent from the previous year. Gov. John Kasich says the opioid crisis is a complex battle, being fought both inside and outside the state.  

Kasich wants to work with law enforcement from other states to help shut down traffickers, increase border protection, and even create security and economic programs for central America.

Aside from clamping the flow of drugs into Ohio, Kasich says people need to comprehend that using fentanyl means instant death.

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ShutterShock / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 24: 

  • Columbus Dispatch reports Ohio fatal drug overdoses increase;
  • East Cleveland school district files lawsuit against Department of Education;
  • State to distribute $12M through safety grants;
  • Canton City Schools dedicates historical marker in honor of Martin Luther King;

Ohio fatal drug overdoses increase

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ROB BYRON / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, August 31:

  • ICE raid detainees indicted;
  • Ohio State trustee resigns amid Urban Meyer decision;
  • Officials confirm fentanyl exposure sicked dozens at Ohio prison;
  • Shapiro announces apartments for homeless female veterans;
  • State to begin mailing absentee ballots;
  • New body armor arrives for state agents after grievance;
  • Barberton teen pleads guilty in mansion arson;

13 ICE raid detainees indicted

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CREATIVE COMMONS/FLICKR

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 30:

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SAM HOWZIT / FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 2, 2018:

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has signed a bill into law that increases penalties for drug trafficking.

Cuyahoga Falls resident Brenda Ryan is raising her 7-year-old grandson after his mother, Sheena Moore, died from a drug overdose in 2016. She was only 31 years old. 

Ryan says the man who provided the deadly drugs to her daughter spent only eight years in prison because the penalties were reduced once it was determined the drug wasn’t heroin.

SHUTTERSHOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 16:

  • Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips;
  • Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh donated to Richard Cordray;
  • Ohio approves legislation to honor Charles Follis;
  • Ohio State University president Michael Drake in top 10 highest paid among university presidents;
  • Akron kicks off Soap Box Derby;
  • Cleveland Cavaliers to re-sign Channing Frye;

Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips

Federal Program Targets Lorain County Fentanyl Dealers

Jul 13, 2018
photo of substance found at drug bust that may be fentanyl
U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency

Stemming the tide of drug overdose deaths in Lorain County and nine others across the country is the focus of a new pilot program from the U.S. Attorney General’s office.

photo of substance found at drug bust that may be fentanyl
U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency

Since 2016 the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has been telling its agents, police and first responders that just touching the drug fentanyl can be lethal. Some researchers now say evidence doesn’t support such a dramatic advisory.  But one Ohio scientist says the DEA should continue the warning anyway.

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 27:

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Family of Tamir Rice

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, June 15:

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M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here's your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 12: 

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WKSU

A measure to crackdown on the shipment of opioids from China is moving its way through Congress. Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman touts this provision as a key tool in the fight against the drug epidemic.

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 4:

photo of drug testing device
SEN. SHERROD BROWN

Sen. Sherrod Brown is introducing a bill tomorrow to provide funding for devices that detect fentanyl.

The POWER Act would provide funds for portable chemical screening devices, such as those being used by Customs and Border Protection agents. Sen. Brown says they’re needed because local law enforcement officers need to be able to test drugs in the field to ensure they’re not in danger of an accidental overdose, such as the one that happened last year to an officer in Columbiana County.

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