farms

A photo of a flooded farm field
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After weeks of heavy rainfall and flooding, 15 percent of Ohio farmland has gone unplanted. In states like Kansas, Minnesota and Nebraska this usually triggers an uptick in farms filing for bankruptcy. But a report from researchers at The Ohio State University shows Ohio farms have not followed this trend.

A photo of a flooded farm field
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is giving farmers another opportunity to apply for loans as they deal with severe weather and flooding that has kept many farmers from planting their crops.

The Ohio Treasurer’s Office is reopening its Ag-LINK program which can grant farmers up to $150,000 in loans.

The program usually operates between January and March, but Treasurer Robert Sprague said this can help those struggling with flooding.

photo of farm field
Dan Konik / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s agriculture director asked the federal government to help the state’s farmers, many of whom have been unable to plant crops because of rainy weather.

Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda said she’s traveled the state and witnessed firsthand how record rainfall has devastated farmers. 

farm
VIVIAN GOODMAN / WKSU

A bill passed by the State Senate this week is heading to the House, and would change the way farmers pay property taxes.

Since the 1970s, the state has used a formula to determine taxes based on farmland’s agricultural value, as opposed to full market value. In recent years, those numbers have risen quickly due to several factors, such as the taxation of land used for conservation  – such as cover crops -- at the same rate as regular farmland.