faculty strike

Democratic state lawmakers and state education officials are weighing in on the faculty union strike at Wright State University, 18 days after professors walked off the job.

Wright State University’s faculty union strike could affect the school’s credit rating if it continues much longer, according to an analyst for Moody’s Investor Services. A lower credit rating could make it more difficult for Wright State to take out loans.

Only two years ago, Moody’s lowered Wright State’s credit rating three notches from A2 to Baa2. At the time, analysts said the school’s, “severe financial deterioration in a short period of time," led to the downgrade.

In the past two and a half years, staff members at Wright State, who are not unionized, have experienced major budget cuts, changes to their benefits, and several rounds of layoffs. Now, as the faculty union strike enters its second day, the university is relying on them to cover for striking professors.

Hundreds of members of Wright State’s faculty union walked off the job Tuesday. The university's chapter of the American Association of University Professors union announced its intent to strike earlier this month after contract talks stalled.

With temperatures hovering in the teens, about 100 students chanted as they marched across Wright State’s campus to join professors on the picket lines.

A newly formed pro-union student group called WSU Students for Faculty organized the march.