Executions

Photo of lethal injection table
KEN PIORKOWSKI / FLICKR

The Ohio Supreme Court has added a new inmate to the execution schedule – though Gov. Mike DeWine has delayed four executions until a new way to carry them out is developed. 

Sherrod Brown at Ohio military installation
SHERROD BROWN STAFF / FACEBOOK

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 8:

The Lordstown GM plant across the road from the TJX site
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 27:

Mike DeWine
ANNIE WU / WCPN

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 20:

photo of Gov. Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine says no executions will happen in Ohio until the state can come up with a new lethal injection process.

DeWine cites a federal court judge’s opinion on Ohio’s lethal injection process and the upcoming execution of Wayne Keith Henness, which DeWine delayed.

“Ohio’s not going to execute someone on my watch when it’s cruel and unusual punishment.”

DeWine says executions can resume when there’s a new protocol that can survive court challenges.

picture of execution bed
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio has executed a second convicted killer with a three-drug mixture that was first tried in July. But the condemned inmate’s lawyer says there may have been a problem this time.

45 year old Gary Otte of Indiana died at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville about 31 minutes after his execution began. Jim Province of the Toledo Blade has witnessed executions before, including a problematic one in 2006. Province says Otte apologized for his crimes, sang a hymn, and then didn’t move after the drugs took effect.

picture of execution bed
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An outspoken critic of the death penalty says -- though yesterday’s lethal injection of Ronald Phillips was problem-free -- he worries that won’t be the case with the more than two-dozen executions scheduled over the next three years.

Southern Ohio Correctional Facility
DAN KONIK / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The state of Ohio executed its first death row inmate in more than three years today (Wednesday). Ronald  Phillips of Akron was sentenced to die 23 years ago, and the latest 3 ½ year delay in his execution and others followed a legal battle triggered by a questionable lethal injection in 2014. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this execution seemed to have a very different result.

Ronald Phillips
The FORGIVENESS FOUNDATION

After hiatus of more than three years, Ohio is set to resume executions at 10 this morning by putting Ronald Phillips of Akron to death. His lawyers filed last-minute arguments that the drug combination Ohio plans to use has a troubling history. But as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, that’s not the only argument being offered.

photo of death penalty vigil
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is set to execute an Akron man inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in 3 1/2 years. And death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

Retired United Church of Christ pastor, the Rev. Lynda Smith, is one of about a dozen people who stood outside the building where Gov. John Kasich’s office is located, holding signs and sending a message to him to stop executions in Ohio.

picture of execution bed
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A three-judge panel put executions in Ohio on hold almost three weeks ago. Now the full Sixth Circuit of Appeals will decide whether Ohio can use the three-drug method of execution it has proposed.

The state announced last fall it was moving to a three drug combination after having trouble getting other drugs it wanted to use. Prisons director Gary Mohr has said the state needs to a decision to proceed with 32 scheduled executions over the next four years.

photo of death row inmates
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION AND CORRECTION

The governor has delayed eight upcoming executions because of a federal court fight over the constitutionality of the state’s lethal injection process.

picture of execution bed
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state parole board has released its recommendation on whether Gov. John Kasich should spare the life of a man who killed two people in back-to-back robberies in Parma almost exactly 25 years ago.

Kasich took some unrelated action on executions while waiting on that report.

The parole board unanimously recommended Kasich reject clemency for 45-year-old Gary Otte, who shot two people in their apartments in back-to-back robberies in Parma on February 12 and 13, 1992.

Anti-execution rally
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A coalition of anti-death penalty advocates are hoping Gov. John Kasich will once again delay the execution of a death row inmate next month. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, religious leaders tried to appeal to Kasich’s faith.

Activists with Ohioans to Stop Executions spread out through the Statehouse to hand out letters to the governor’s office and lawmakers.

During a rally, Misha Zinkow, a rabbi at Temple Israel, explained why he believed capital punishment goes against Jewish values.