environment

Some of the storm waters from our rainy spring weather are now being diverted back to Mother Nature thanks to a new "green infrastructure" project on Cleveland's East Side. The Buckeye Road site also features public art with an environmental theme.

Four blocks of abandoned homes and businesses along Buckeye Road were recently plowed down and replaced with a series of rain gardens and grassy dips in the landscape, called detention basins, that will hold storm water, after a heavy rain.

photo of recycling
WKSU

The City of Akron has partnered with local sustainability organizations to institute a Recycle Right campaign. ReWorks and Keep Akron Beautiful will work with the city to teach residents how to properly recycle.

Keep Akron Beautiful CEO, Jacqui Ricchiuti, says people need a refresher on what is recyclable.

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 6:

A photo of the Everett Covered Bridge. It crosses Furnace Run in Ohio's Cuyahoga Valley National Park.
KENNETH KEIFER / SHUTTERSTOCK

Environmental advocates say time is running out to save a federal fund that helps improve local parks, pools, and playgrounds. 

For decades the Land and Water Conservation Fund has given a boost to improvement projects. They range in size from as small as parking lots for local swimming pools to as large as millions of dollars in improvements for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and Wayne National Forest.

Ricardo Granados of the Ohio Environmental Council says, whether they know it or not, many Ohioans have likely benefited from this fund.

photo of carbon emissions
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

A group of Northeast states is taking issue with industrial pollution drifting in from the south and Midwest. New York and seven others are suing the U.S. EPA to add Ohio and eight other states to the Ozone Transport Region.

Summit Metro Parks to Recycle Used Christmas Trees

Dec 26, 2017
Photo of Summit Metro Parks
Summit Metro Parks

Summit Metro Parks is holding its annual drop-off locations for used Christmas trees.

Lindsay Smith is the marketing coordinator for Metro Parks. She says the trees are used to beautify its parks.

Residents can give their trees a second life beyond Christmas and the Metro Parks can use this wood to chip into mulch, and our crew use it around our trailheads to use as landscaping compost.

Smith says they usually get over 100 yards of mulch from the donations.

Metro parks began the Christmas tree recycling program in 1970.

City of Cleveland

President Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to the U.S. EPA are raising concerns about federal help for cleaning up and reclaiming brownfields. One organization closely watching the potential loss of funding helps developers with brownfield sites in Summit County.

photo of FERC
MARK URYCKI / IDEASTREAM

The NEXUS gas pipeline is not a done deal, but a federal environmental impact statement issued on Wednesday helps clear the way for the project’s construction.

The NEXUS gas pipeline could have some negative environmental effects, but mitigation measures could reduce the impact to “less than significant levels.” That’s according to the final environmental impact statement issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 

The proposed natural gas pipeline stretches across more than 255 miles from eastern Ohio through Stark, Medina and Lorain counties and into Michigan.

photo of DNC trashcans
IRINA ZHOROV / WKSU

The Democratic party's platform on the environment, has lofty goals. The Democratic National Convention itself in Philadelphia is trying to live up to them while hosting 50-thousand people.

Can all those people travel, eat and party without taking a toll on the environment? 

If you're looking for a trash can at the Pennsylvania Convention Center or the Wells Fargo Center, where the DNC events are taking place, you'll likely come across a set of three bins: one for recycling, one for compost, and one for the landfill.

Task force
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

A new task force took its first look today at what it would take to convert Akron’s streets into greener versions that better integrate pedestrians, cyclists and buses as well as cars.

   The group of planners, politicians and community representatives including a environmentally friendly Realtor and the YMCA, is digging into a draft of a city law that would build a concept called “Livable, Complete and Green Streets” into construction and reconstruction projects throughout the city.