energy bill

A photo of a worker gathering signatures on a petition
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The anti-nuclear bailout group argued in federal court Tuesday that they should get an extension to their petition drive. They say Ohio law restricts their constitutional rights to hold a referendum. But state lawyers blame the referendum effort of being full of bad business decisions.

photo of House Bill 6 petitioners
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Petitioners are giving one last push into the drive that would put Ohio's nuclear bailout law before voters. The referendum effort must file enough valid signatures by Monday afternoon in order to qualify for next year's ballot.

Opponents of the law said it's a corporate bailout for FirstEnergy Solutions. They're also against the coal subsidies and the cuts to green energy policies. That's why they want to put the law on the ballot for a potential repeal.

a photo of the petition
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The group that wants voters to overturn Ohio’s nuclear power plant bailout has filed a federal lawsuit, claiming the rules are unfairly stacked against them and that their opponents are using that to their advantage.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts has less than two weeks to collect the signatures they need to put a referendum before voters next year.

a photo of people signing petition
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There is yet another group jumping into the fray over Ohio's nuclear bailout law. Protect Ohio Clean Energy Jobs is fighting to save the $1 billion in subsidies meant for FirstEnergy Solutions. The group is taking an uncommon approach.

Protect Ohio Clean Energy Jobs said voters are being deceived by anti-nuclear bailout petitioners, so they're using targeted ads on social media urging people who have already signed the HB6 referendum to take their names off the petition. The group's treasurer lobbies for FirstEnergy Solutions, which runs the nuclear plants.

A photo of a worker gathering signatures on a petition
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The intense fight over a petition drive seeking to overturn Ohio's nuclear bailout law is escalating with a counter petition now circulating around the state. The pro-nuclear bailout group is calling it a grassroots effort which doubles down on their anti-foreign investors’ message.

Common Cause Ohio and the League of Women Voters Ohio raising awareness about the importance of campaign finance transparency.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A lot of money is pouring into the fight to put the nuclear power plant bailout before voters. The scathing campaign against the referendum attempt has a collection of good government groups calling for campaign finance transparency. 

Pro-nuclear bailout groups have flooded the airwaves and mailboxes with ads that try to scare people into not signing the petition, claiming the effort is connected to Chinese government interests.

a photo of the flier
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A group fighting to protect the state law bailing out nuclear power plants is plastering the state with fliers. The mailings urge people not to sign a petition that would put a rejection of the bailout before voters, connecting the referendum effort to Chinese government interests.

These fliers are popping up in mailboxes everywhere. A bold Chinese flag draped over a fading American flag, with the message "Don't Give The Chinese Government Your Information."

A photo of hands on jail bars.
SPAXIAX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, September 3:

photo of Perry Nuclear Plant
JERRY SHARP / SHUTTERSTOCK

The group fighting against Ohio's nuclear bailout law can officially begin collecting signatures to put a referendum on next year's ballot. But they face a steep uphill climb, having to collect more than 265,000 signatures in seven weeks.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts got the final approval they needed from the secretary of state to send volunteers and paid workers out to collect signatures from voters.

photo of someone signing a petition
STEVE ESTVANIK / SHUTTERSTOCK

The battle lines have been drawn for the fight over Ohio's new energy law.

A ballot group is looking to collect signatures statewide to ask voters to overturn the law that bails out nuclear power plants. But a new group has formed to argue in favor of the ratepayer subsidies.

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio voting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There’s a growing debate over whether a group can put a referendum on next year's ballot that reverses the nuclear bailout bill. The dispute revolves around whether or not the increased rate on electric bills should be considered a tax increase.

A Columbus law firm sent a memo to the Secretary of State arguing that the new energy law charging electric customers up to $2.35 a month for nuclear, coal and solar subsidies, is a tax increase. Citizens can't use a referendum to challenge a tax increase.

photo of House of Representatives
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Attorney General is looking over referendum language filed by a group fighting the state’s new energy law.

photo of perry nuclear power plant
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A group has officially filed its first round of signatures calling for a referendum on Ohio’s new energy law that bails out nuclear plants and scraps green energy policies. They hope to put the issue on the 2020 ballot.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts organized to fight the law that subsidizes FirstEnergy Solutions’ two nuclear plants through a new fee on monthly electric bills.

The law also props up two struggling coal plants, creates subsidies for solar farms, and rolls back policies that required investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency.

photo of Larry Householder
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Opponents of the new law that will give $150 million a year in subsidies to Ohio’s two nuclear power plants are working on a plan to ask voters to overturn it. The leader of the Ohio House said they’ll need big money to do that, and he’s very concerned about what he sees as a possible source for those funds.

a photo of Davis Besse power plant
TWITTER

A group can now begin collecting campaign funds for a possible referendum on the state’s new energy law. The political action committee is looking at possibly fighting the law that subsidizes two nuclear plants to the tune of $150 million a year.

The group Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts is leading the charge for a possible ballot issue to stop the new energy law, which creates subsidies for nuclear, coal and solar.

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction, according to Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, who chairs an energy and water subcommittee in the U. S. House of Representatives.  

On Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine signed a $1 billion dollar bailout to help FirstEnergy Solutions continue to operate two nuclear plants in Ohio.

a photo of the Ohio House of Representatives
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House has voted in favor of the sweeping energy bill, HB6, that bails out two nuclear power plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies.


photo of entrance to FirstEnergy Solutions' Perry Nuclear plant
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The sweeping energy bill that would save nuclear plants from shutting down while making big cuts to renewable and efficiency policies has stalled. The house speaker says some of the representatives who would’ve voted “yes” on the measure weren’t present, so he put off the vote.

“We had four ‘yes’ votes when the bill left the House that were not here today.”

a photo of an Ohio senator
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Senate is rolling out more changes to the comprehensive energy bill that would bail out Ohio’s nuclear power plants.

The latest version of the bill makes big changes to energy efficiency policies.

                       

A photo of Perry Nuclear Power Plant
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Senate has made big changes to the energy bill that could bail out Ohio’s nuclear power plants. Along with nuclear subsidies, a Senate committee has restored standards for renewable energy and energy efficiency--for now.

The changes mean a residential ratepayer would pay 80 cents a month on their electric bill. That, along with higher charges for commercial and industrial ratepayers, would give Ohio’s nuclear plants about $150 million.

A photo of House Speaker Larry Householder.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate will begin official hearings on the extensive energy bill that would redirect the state’s attention away from renewables and subsidize nuclear and coal instead.

As a lead-up to hearings, state senators heard testimony from researchers and industry experts. 

The bill, which would bail out nuclear power and get rid of wind and solar mandates, has already passed the House.