Education

photo of Infocision Stadium
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

California recently passed a law that will allow college athletes to be compensated through endorsement deals beginning in 2023. Some state lawmakers want to pass a similar bill in Ohio.

Democratic Rep Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) says she and some other lawmakers are discussing elements they’d like to see in a bill to allow compensation of college players.

“Even some high profile collegiate coaches are talking about how the system is unfair to players,” Howse says.

Ohio State University officials are reporting more than 1,500 separate instances where former team doctor Richard Strauss sexually assaulted students.

a photo of Gary L Miller
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

The University of Akron is experimenting with new ideas to enhance sustainability and foster a better relationship with the City of Akron. Faculty and students are working together to establish a plan to make it happen. Anthropology professor, Carolyn Behrman, said they’re focusing on four areas including water, polymers, food, and the university’s identity as it prepares to celebrate its 150th anniversary. She said the launch of the nine-month effort coincides with the arrival of the university’s new president Gary Miller.

Gordon: Cleveland Schools Finally Have Momentum

Sep 26, 2019

In his annual State of the Schools address Thursday, Cleveland public schools CEO Eric Gordon turned to Sir Isaac Newton to describe the district’s progress: the schools finally have momentum.

Propelled by the 7-year-old Cleveland Plan for Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD), Gordon said that momentum shows in increased graduation rates and the 2.6 percent growth in K-3 literacy rates.

Jay Gershen
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

September 30th is Dr. Jay Gershen’s last day as president of the Northeast Ohio Medical University.

During his decade at the helm of NEOMED, Gershen has emphasized the school’s mission to produce doctors to serve Northeast Ohio’s diverse communities.

The Ohio Senate Education Committee is scheduled for a possible vote on, HB154, a measure that would overhaul the way the state handles failing school districts. The bill would attempt to move away from what's known as state takeovers of local districts, but critics say there's still not enough local control. 

students voting at machines
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This is the time of year when students choose their school’s homecoming courts. And kids in one Franklin County high school are voting in a very official way.

In the gym of Westland High School, real voting machines are programmed with the names of homecoming candidates. Kids make their choices, print out the paper ballots and then take them to another machine that will tally them before Friday night’s football game.            

Senate Education Committee
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Senate Republicans have made several big changes to a bill that would have repealed and replaced the process used to takeover failing schools. But critics of the new piece of legislation said the changes are just another form of state school takeovers.

The new process would create a school transformation board made up of state officials and gubernatorial appointees. That board would oversee an improvement plan from school districts that continue to see Fs on state report cards.

Ohio is one of six states chosen for a program to increase the upward mobility of adult learners. The goal of the "Educate for Opportunity" project is to train workers for technical and other jobs that are in high demand. 

At least four Southwest Ohio schools are participating in a program which uses a smart thermometer and an app to track and stop the spread of disease.

The Cleveland Metropolitan School District is no longer failing, according to the Ohio schools report card released Thursday. The district’s overall grade rose to a D this year, but news was mixed for three schools under state oversight. Lorain City Schools, like Cleveland, received a D overall. East Cleveland and Youngstown school districts both failed.

photo of the Ohio Board of Education
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

School districts all around Ohio are taking a close look at their new report cards. The state-issued analysis includes an overall letter grade for each district.

Seven of the state's eight big urban districts improved from an "F" to a "D." That includes Dayton, which was in danger of a potential state takeover.

David James
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The state of Ohio has released 2019 school district report cards, and Akron Public Schools Superintendent David James says the district is outpacing "most all other urban school systems."

Overall the district earned an achievement grade of D. 

But James points out, "Fifty-one percent of our 46 schools received report card grades of either A, B or C, and we continue to improve at a healthy rate."

Akron results include one A for Akron Early College High School. The rest of the school performances:

photo of Hiram College entrance
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Hiram College’s plan to reduce tuition by thirty-five percent for all undergrads could have an impact well beyond the school.

Hiram College President Lori Varlotta says the goal is to reduce the sticker shock of going to Hiram and ease concern when applying. Varlotta says in the past her students rarely paid the full price, which was $37,710.

Ohio lawmakers will soon consider a school funding formula overhaul, which has undergone some changes since it was first introduced in March. But the state’s leading school funding expert says he’s giving the plan mixed grades, and that it needs more work.

photo of Juul
ANNA HUNTSMAN / WKSU

A local school district is trying a new way to fight the vaping epidemic. The Revere School District has installed 16 “FlySense” chemical and noise detectors in the middle school, high school and field house.

photo of University of Akron
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

Ohio's public universities are teaming up to create one simplified process for students and staff to commercialize their research and inventions. Leaders believe this will bring Ohio national attraction for entrepreneurship.

The partnership among the state's public universities will create a set of guiding principles so researchers can take their work and inventions to the marketplace.

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted said there are many universities around the country that do this well.

a photo of a classroom
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Kids are back in class all over Ohio, and this year’s incoming freshman class has a new set of standards they’ll have to meet to graduate in four years. What are the new requirements and how will they test the kids who will need to achieve them?

Amy Obhof greets a classroom full of new freshmen at Licking Heights High School, in central Ohio, before jumping straight into her World History lesson.

a photo of Lorain Academic Distress Commission
LORAIN SCHOOLS TV20 / YOUTUBE

On its most recent report card from the state education department, Lorain City Schools earned five Fs and one D. Its poor performance led the state to take control of the district under controversial legislation known as House Bill 70.  

Lorain is one of three Ohio districts under state control.

The Ohio State University plans to increase its minimum wage for non-union and Wexner Medical Center employees to $15 an hour starting next year.

The Ohio Medical Board had credible evidence of sexual misconduct by longtime Ohio State doctor Richard Strauss in 1996 but didn't inform law enforcement, a review by a state working group found.

A photo of Joe Miller speaking
THE OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

A state representative is joining the call for the state-appointed CEO of Lorain City Schools to be more transparent.

In a letter to David Hardy, Amherst Democrat Joe Miller requested financial documents, contracts and administrator evaluations.

Hardy was appointed to the post under the provisions of House Bill 70. Passed in 2015 it allowed for the state to take control of three failing school districts; Lorain, East Cleveland and Youngstown.

Miller says the bill doesn’t give districts the help they need.

photo of Lorain City Schools logo
LORAIN CITY SCHOOLS

The president of the Lorain school board said there’s no risk that employees will not be paid. Mark Ballard responded to comments from the district's CEO David Hardy. Hardy wrote staff saying a restraining order from the school board would prevent him from hiring a new treasurer to handle payroll. Ballard called Hardy an "unqualified dictator."

“First of all, we know state law is never going to allow teachers who are doing their job to not get paid, or public employees not to get paid. So that was a false narrative that he put out.”

Wilberforce University near Dayton needs to raise $2 million to keep its accreditation. But the “Wilberforce Unite” effort has brought in roughly $478,000, according to its campaign website.

That’s less than a quarter of its goal.

Wilberforce officials refused a request for comment. 

A comeback will be difficult given the school’s troubles, says MaryBeth Gasman, director of the Center for Minority Serving Institutions at Rutgers University and an expert on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Gov. Mike DeWine says more needs to be done to make sure Ohio’s schools are safe. And he's signed an executive order to immediately put more resources in place.

Pages