drinking water

DIARI LA VEU / FLICKR CC

Lake Erie has one of the highest concentrations of microplastic pollution in the world.

Sherri Mason, a researcher at Penn State Behrend in Erie, was the first to report that finding.

Her discovery led to congressional action banning microbeads in consumer products.

On this week’s Exploradio,  we spend some time with Mason finding out how microplastic pollution remains a health hazard.

photo of KSU President Beverly Warren
NATHANIEL BAILEY / KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, April 29:

photo of a water fountain
RISHABH MISHRA / FLICKR

New requirements aim to keep Ohioans safe from lead contamination in their drinking water.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency now requires each public water system to give residents 45 days’ notice when lead pipes will be worked on. They have to provide filters if a pipe is being replaced.

a photo of the Kent campus
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, June 28:

  • Nine Northeast Ohio public colleges sign collaborative compact;
  • Massillon Museum to use grant to combat stigmas in Appalachia;
  • Firm hired to investigate lawmaker also donated to him;
  • Ohio legislature relaxes standards at virtual academy;
  • Akron officials say discolored water is safe to drink;
  • Cleveland Museum of Natural History names permanent CEO;

Nine Northeast Ohio public colleges sign collaborative compact

photo of Great Lakes
GOOGLE EARTH

Aging infrastructure in the Great Lakes region affects the availability of safe drinking water and the ability of ships to navigate the lakes. President Trump campaigned on improving the country’s infrastructure, and one organization wants the needs of the Great Lakes at the top of the administration’s list.

Lead pipe map
Cleveland Division of Water

Customers in Northeast Ohio who get their water from the Cleveland Division of Water can now go online to see if they are among the nearly 45 percent who are connected to service lines that likely to contain lead.  

The Cleveland utility serves almost 420,000 homes and businesses. And Water Commissioner Alex Margevicius says service pipes installed after 1954 do not contain lead.