Dennis Willard

The group Ohioans for Gun Safety is making a push to get a popular gun control measure in front of voters.

According to the group’s spokesman Dennis Willard, they’re focused on one issue: getting mandatory universal background checks passed in Ohio.

Volunteers for the group spent Election Day at polling sites statewide, asking for signatures to put a new gun control law on the 2020 ballot.

photo of gun
LUTSENKO OLEKSANDR / SHUTTERSTOCK

The group pushing for expanded background checks on gun sales said the tragic mass shooting in Dayton has galvanized the state. Petitioners say it's time for Ohio lawmakers to take this issue of closing the so-called "Gun Show Loophole" seriously. 

Dennis Willard with the group Ohioans for Gun Safety said they're seeing an increase in donations, volunteers, and signatures.

photo of guns
KEITH HOMAN / SHUTTERSTOCK

In the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohioans for Gun Safety says now is the time for state lawmakers to pass tougher gun regulations. The group says they have the blueprint for one critical issue.

Ohioans for Gun Safety is collecting signatures to petition the Ohio Legislature to expand and strengthen background checks on gun sales, this includes closing the loopholes on online and gun show sales.

a photo of handguns and loose ammunition
KLATTIPONG / SHUTTERSTOCK

A group is kicking off a campaign for expanded background checks for gun sales, which could end up on next year’s ballot. Ohioans for Gun Safety said closing the so-called “Gun Show Loophole” will help keep firearms away from people who are not legally allowed to have them.

The proposed law would require the sale and transfer of a gun to be conducted by a federally-licensed firearms dealer. And that exchange would be conditioned on the person receiving a background check.

photo of morgue
SKYWARD KICK PRODUCTIONS / SHUTTERSTOCK

The Ohio State Coroners Association has come out adamantly against the only issue on the statewide ballot, saying they can’t be for any measure that makes it more difficult to prosecute drug dealers and traffickers.

Ohio coroners say Issue 1 will help re-sentence drug dealers, putting them back on the streets to “continue poisoning their communities.”

Cuyahoga County Drug Court Judge Opposes Issue 1

Sep 25, 2018
NICK CASTELE / ideastream

One of Cuyahoga County’s drug court judges joined Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine in opposing state Issue 1, which would reduce penalties for drug possession.

 

Judge Joan Synenberg, who presides over one of the county’s two drug dockets, spoke alongside DeWine at a campaign event Monday.

Drug courts put defendants on a plan to receive treatment in exchange for having their case dismissed. Fifty-five counties in Ohio have at least one drug docket.

A photo of the flyer.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued a landmark ruling that overturns 40 years of precedent and ends compelled union dues for public employees. Now, a right leaning think tank is going a step further and mailing literature to make sure public employees in Ohio know they don’t have to pay into the union. 

The Buckeye Institute’s flier promotes a website where workers can find information on how to quit paying union dues. The organization’s president, Robert Alt, says they deserve to know how to do that.

Issue 2 was the most expensive ballot campaign in Ohio history, and it went down big with nearly 80% of voters against it. And while supporters will take the campaign to other states, an Ohio campaign spokesperson says this election turned a light on a flaw with the process.

Yes on Issue 2 spokesperson Dennis Willard says big drug companies were able to conceal their names and the millions of dollars each contributed to defeating the Drug Price Relief Act.

photo of Rory Rennick
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Two sides are battling over an issue on this fall’s ballot that attempts to lower the costs of prescription drugs. As expected big drug companies have landed right in the middle of the fight. Exactly who is funding that side remains a big question mark.

“Which pile do you want?” asks Rory Rennick as he performs some street magic at on Capitol Square in Columbus.  He has a tray table, a deck of cards and some fancy handwork.

“Count the cards in your hand.”

The ballot language for issues voters will see during this November’s election has been finalized. One side is making sure to highlight a certain section of the language.

Opponents of the so-called Drug Price Relief Act, which forces the state to pay for drugs at a discount, argue that taxpayers would be on the hook for large legal bills. That includes paying the court fees for the California-based sponsors of the initiative.

The November election is more than three months away. But there’s a lot going with the issue that’s likely to be the most expensive ballot question in state history – a proposed law that would force the state to only buy drugs at a discounted price.