Dayton shooting

photo of DeWine, Obhof, and Housholder
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It's been more than six weeks since Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled a comprehensive approach to reducing gun violence, which included expanded background checks and a version of the red flag confiscation law. But so far lawmakers have yet to see those specific plans in the form of proposed legislation.

DeWine said he wants to close the background check loopholes in personal gun sales. He also wants to expand the ability for courts to confiscate weapons from people deemed to be a threat to themselves or others.

But so far no official bills have been proposed.

photo of the entrance to the Bellwether Music Festival
DAVID GIFFELS

There’s a relatively new music festival near Dayton that bears the nickname many political watchers have given Ohio: Bellwether. For author David Giffels, who’s working on a new book about what's on the minds of voters ahead of next year’s presidential election, that was enough for him to include it in his travels around the state. In this month's check-in with Giffels, we talk with him about his recent trip to the Bellwether Music Festival.

Dave Chappelle has announced a free benefit show in response to the recent Oregon District mass shooting that left nine people dead and more than 30 others injured.

The Gem City Shine show is intended to help neighborhood businesses recover after the attack, and raise money for The Dayton Foundation’s Oregon District Tragedy Fund, says the Downtown Dayton Partnership’s Sandy Gudorf.

She says the idea for the show was born after the entertainer contacted the city offering to help.

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

a photo of William Wood with a rifle in hand
PAIGE PFLEGER / WOSU

William Wood answers the door to his suburban Columbus home with a Glock 19 on his hip. His two toddler-aged children, Daisey and Wesley, peak out from behind his legs.  

Cartoons are playing on the TV as Wood shows his gun collection in the living room. He pulls loaded gun magazines off a closet shelf, buried underneath Monopoly and Candy Land.

"This camo one here shoots a .300 Blackout, this is a standard 5.56 round," Wood says. "The kid in Dayton, he used that, unfortunately."

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey.

New details are emerging about the investigation into the August 4 Oregon District mass shooting that left nine people dead.

A friend of the Dayton gunman who killed nine people told federal agents he bought him body armor, a gun accessory and a 100-round magazine earlier this year, according to a court document unsealed Monday.

screenshot of Chris Dorr from the OGO video
FACEBOOK

The Ohio Highway Patrol is reviewing comments made by a leader of a pro-gun rights group following the unveiling of a package of gun control proposals by Gov. Mike DeWine.

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Gun control advocates see DeWine's proposals for a version of the "Red Flag Law" and expanded background checks as a good first step towards reducing gun violence.

And Kristine Woodworth with Moms Demand Action had a message for Ohio lawmakers who don't come to the table.

Dion Green is a soft-spoken 37-year-old with short dreadlocks and a muscular build. He works at a men's homeless shelter helping the less fortunate.

In recent months, though, Green has been thrust onto the other side of crisis-solving. He has now found himself the one who is trying to traverse misery.

a photo of Peggy Lehner
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of a Republican legislator who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo. The proposed law allows courts to remove guns from someone deemed a potential threat to themselves or others.

Following the mass shooting in Dayton, State Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who represents areas around the city, said she will no longer be timid in her stance for "common sense" gun regulation.

photo of Tim Ryan with parents in Cuyahoga Falls
DAVID WILLIAMS / WKSU

Congressman Tim Ryan is joining Moms Demand Action on what he’s calling a caravan for change. Ryan (D-OH 13th district) stopped briefly in Cuyahoga Falls Wednesday morning on his way to Kentucky, the home state of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The group is urging McConnell to bring House-passed gun control legislation before the Senate. 

More than 200 mayors, including two anguished by mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, are urging the Senate to return to the Capitol to act on gun safety legislation amid criticism that Congress is failing to respond to back-to-back shootings that left 31 people dead.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

President Donald Trump met with first responders and victims of Sunday’s mass shooting in Dayton, along with Gov. Mike DeWine. The meeting gave the two a chance to talk about changes in gun policies.

DeWine said he talked to Trump about proposed changes at the statewide level – more mental health services, more laws to prevent criminals from getting guns and tightening laws regarding the sale of guns. DeWine said Trump wanted more information about those proposals but didn’t make specific promises.

Photo of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled a slate of gun control proposals in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Dayton August 4. This represents a dramatic shift in the public attitude of Ohio leaders when it comes to gun policies.

When DeWine visited Dayton Sunday to memorialize the people killed that morning he got a message from the crowd, which chanted "Do something!" The chant eventually drowned out DeWine's remarks.

At a press conference August 6, DeWine said that moment was not lost on him. Acknowledged the anger in the crowd and said he's angry too.

Law enforcement authorities say the shooter in the Oregon District attack had a history of obsession with violence and had expressed a previous desire to commit a mass shooting.

Dayton Police announced Tuesday the Federal Bureau of Investigation is taking over the investigation into the 24-year-old killer’s motives in the attack that left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

At a press conference, an FBI special agent from the Cincinnati Field Office told reporters there’s still a lot of evidence to go through. 

President Donald Trump is expected to visit Dayton Wednesday to meet with city officials and first responders, shooting survivors and victims’ families.

Few details about the visit have been released. But news of the president’s trip has already sparked protest in the city where a mass shooting over the weekend left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley has told reporters she anticipates protest, calling President Trump’s rhetoric “painful” for some here.

The family of the 24-year-old man who shot and killed nine people on Sunday, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District has released a statement.

Bellbrook Police Chief, Doug Doherty read the statement to the press near a street blockade set up about three houses away from where the Betts family lives in Bellbrook.

In the statement read by Doherty, the Betts family said they "shocked and devastated by the events of Sunday morning in the Oregon District," and that they are cooperating with the Dayton Police Department and the FBI investigation.

a photo of Gov. Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

In response to the mass shooting in Dayton, Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the Republican-controlled Legislature to pass a slate of gun regulations. His plan includes a version of the so-called "Red Flag Law" and expanded background checks.

DeWine says his 17-point plan is a comprehensive way to reduce gun violence.

Critics say more should've been done sooner.

But DeWine says his office has been working on these initiatives and that it was important to get it right.

The jumble of shoes abandoned by people fleeing for their lives early Sunday morning has been removed from the parking lot of Ned Pepper’s bar. Near the front door, flowers and candles are piling up. Heart-shaped wreaths honoring the victims stand a few feet away.

The Dayton community is in mourning after 9 people were killed and over 30 injured in Sunday’s mass shooting.

Fifth street is typically empty on Mondays because most businesses are closed. But today,  reporters from all over the country pace on the sidewalks. TV news trucks hum on both sides of the street.

Authorities are continuing to investigate this weekend’s mass shooting on East Fifth Street in Dayton's Oregon District. Police have identified the killer as 24-year-old Connor Betts from Bellbrook.

The shooting left nine people dead, including the gunman’s own sister. More than two dozen other people were wounded. One remained in critical condition Sunday night.

Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl told reporters the killer wore body armor and a face mask when he opened fire using an AR-15-like assault rifle.

Sunday night in Dayton’s Oregon District, thousands of people gathered to honor those killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in front of Ned Peppers bar.

Among those attending the vigil, and inspired by the turnout was Erica Pate, a Dayton native now living in Piqua.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

President Trump, responding Monday to the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people, condemned white supremacy and called for the death penalty for mass murderers and domestic terrorists.

Speaking at the White House, Trump said the nation is "overcome with shock, horror and sorrow."