Dayton mass shooting

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

More than four dozen people affected by the Dayton mass shooting this summer are receiving a monetary gift from the Oregon District Tragedy Fund.

The Dayton Foundation and members of a special committee overseeing the fund announced the first round of payouts Monday.

The Aug. 4 massacre killed nine people and injured nearly three dozen others.

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Two weeks after Governor Mike DeWine unveiled his so-called STRONG Ohio gun control package, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up the rhetoric.

The plan disappointed many who wanted universal background checks and a law allowing a judge to take guns from someone deemed a threat. DeWine called for both after the Oregon District mass shooting.

Now, both sides are lobbying lawmakers as they consider DeWine’s gun violence bill. 

a photo of Nan Whaley
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The group, Ohioans for Gun Safety, is moving full steam ahead on its drive to put a ballot issue on gun sale background checks before Ohio voters. It continues collecting signatures for the petition effort, and it got a boost Wednesday from the mayor of a city that recently dealt with a mass shooting. 

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Gov. Mike DeWine’s package of proposals to reduce gun violence through mental health and gun policy changes is getting mixed reviews. 

House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) says the so-called STRONG Ohio plan is weak, especially since it doesn’t include required background checks, which DeWine said early on he wanted and which Democrats have been pushing for.

“It makes it much harder for people in our caucus to get behind something that we don’t quite see as legitimate and strong and what people have requested from us,” Sykes said. 

On Monday, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine laid out the details of his 17-point plan – the STRONG Ohio plan – to address gun violence in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton that left nine dead and dozens wounded.

It is a plan, the Republican governor said, the Ohio legislature – dominated by his fellow Republicans – would vote to approve.

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine plans to reveal on Monday the specifics of his proposal for two major pieces of gun reform: expanded background checks and red-flag gun confiscation. These issues have been at the center of heated debate in the aftermath of the Dayton mass shooting. 

Gun rights groups and Republican lawmakers have been apprehensive to take a stand on DeWine's gun regulations because they haven't seen the specifics.

"The devil's in the details" has been a common phrase used in the eight weeks since DeWine unveiled his preliminary plans.

Of the seven bills the Ohio Senate's Government Oversight and Reform Committee heard today, three were bipartisan.

Senator Rob Portman at the Ohio Statehouse
Statehouse News Bureau

Senator Rob Portman is speaking out in favor of background checks and red flag laws to prevent gun violence. But he says that the senate will only act on a measure it knows the president will support.

Portman says he has conferred with senators Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut.

A federal red flag law would allow police to obtain a court order to confiscate guns from potentially dangerous people.

Portman said such intervention would have been appropriate in the case of the mass shooting in Dayton early last month.

Police officers who killed the gunman responsible for a mass shooting in the Oregon District last month were honored in a White House ceremony on Monday.

At the event, President Trump praised the six police officers, saying they displayed “nerves of steel” during the attack that left nine people dead and dozens more injured. The officers shot and killed the gunman before he could enter Ned Peppers bar, less than 30 seconds after the  attack began.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley joined a group of Congressional Democrats in Washington Monday to lobby for tighter gun regulations. The group that included Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is calling for passage of a bill to expand background checks for gun purchases.

The bipartisan proposal known as H.R.8 would expand background checks to cover private firearm sales.

Mayor Whaley urged the Senate to bring the House bill to a vote.

Thousands of people were in downtown Dayton Sunday for comedian Dave Chappelle's Gem City Shine benefit show. 

Karen Wonders was out of town last Sunday when she received a news alert on her phone of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio. She operates the Maple Tree Cancer Alliance, which provides exercise training to cancer patients and is based there.

"Soon after that I got a phone call from one of our trainers," Wonders said. "And I knew when she was calling that something bad had happened."

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is backing restrictions on sales of military style weapons in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Dayton. 

He'll also support magazine capacity limits and red flag laws that bar potentially dangerous individuals from owning guns.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

President Trump visited survivors of the shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Wednesday before heading to El Paso, Texas, the site of the weekend's other deadly violence. Trump remained out of public view during the Dayton stop.

On the ground in El Paso, Trump said, "We had an amazing day."

"The love, the respect, for the office of the presidency, it was — I wish you could have been in there to see it," he told reporters.

photo of Gov. Mike DeWine
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton. Some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

Gov. Mike DeWine described the mass shooting in Dayton’s historic Oregon District as a nightmare.

As far as supporting new gun regulations, such as expanding background checks, DeWine says “everything’s on the table” as long as it’s constitutional, can pass the General Assembly, and it’s effective .

photo of guns
KEITH HOMAN / SHUTTERSTOCK

In the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohioans for Gun Safety says now is the time for state lawmakers to pass tougher gun regulations. The group says they have the blueprint for one critical issue.

Ohioans for Gun Safety is collecting signatures to petition the Ohio Legislature to expand and strengthen background checks on gun sales, this includes closing the loopholes on online and gun show sales.

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, August 5, 2019: