cyber attacks

Gov. Mike DeWine signing bill
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Secretary of State says his office fought off an attempted hack on this past Election Day. After further investigation, the attempt to get into the office's system was traced back to a company in Russia. 

Sec. of State Frank LaRose’s office says there was what they call an "unsophisticated and unsuccessful" attempt to insert code to the office's website on Election Day earlier this month.

a photo of John Nicholas and Stan Smith
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Like death and taxes, being hit by a computer virus seems inevitable.

Cybercrime took a $100 billion bite out of the U.S. economy last year alone.

It’s not just individuals who are hacked. Cities, schools and small businesses are increasingly targeted.

In this week’s Exploradio, a look at local efforts to fight the onslaught by training the next generation of cyber warriors.

Kelly Kendrick is IT director at Coventry Local Schools, a small district south of Akron.

computers
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The Ohio House last week approved the creation of a civilian force of ‘cyber-warriors.’

The bill is now headed back to the Senate for a final vote to establish the Ohio Cyber Reserve.

photo of national guardsman at computer
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Cleveland City Council has approved spending $750,000 to hire two technology firms to fix computer problems at Hopkins Airport.

The city says malicious software infected the airport’s computer network, disrupting flight and baggage claim display terminals as well as the email system.

This week a Brunswick church also fell victim to hackers. St. Ambrose was tricked into putting nearly $2 million into a phony bank account. 

Preliminary work on Rover route west of Wooster
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The Rover Pipeline’s corporate parent came under cyber-attack this week, according to Bloomberg News, as did three other natural gas transmission companies. No pipeline operations or safety systems were affected.

Several state government websites in Ohio and two other states were down for several hours after hackers posted messages that seem to support the Islamic State.

The same messages were posted on the official sites of the Ohio prisons department and the state Medicaid and casino control agencies, among others, as well as that of Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor and Gov. John Kasich, who was a Republican candidate for president last year.

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s auditor is warning local governments about a new scam that seems to be ramping up around Ohio and taking taxpayer money.

Auditor Dave Yost says local governments need to verify where emails are coming from before workers click on links or opening attachments.

He says there’s been an uptick in reports to his office about cyber-attacks like ransomware that can take control of a government’s data in exchange for money and “spearphishing” which has bilked counties and townships out of thousands of dollars.