COVID-19

An image of St. Vincent St. Mary High School in Akron
/ GOOGLE EARTH

Northeast Ohio high schools could resume sports skills training last week. Many of them have been taking the reopening process slowly.

At St. Vincent-St. Mary High School in Akron, director of communications and baseball coach Anthony Boarman says that once facilities start to open, there will be a ramp up in the number of athletes allowed in.

photo of Emilia Sykes
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 2:

A photo of a factory worker.
/ CONSUMER ENERGY ALLIANCE

The manufacturing industry has suffered during the economic shutdown caused by the pandemic. A new report from the Institute for Supply Management expects the industry won’t return to pre-recession levels until 2022.

As local health departments try to contain the spread of coronavirus by tracking down those who might have been exposed to people with COVID-19, the Ohio House passed a bill requiring health officials to get written permission from people before beginning the contact tracing process.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, June 1:

a photo of the Boardman Library sign
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

When Northeast Ohio libraries shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic, many people lost a connection to crucial resources. The Ohio Library Council has been working with libraries to find new ways to serve patrons. 

This week some libraries will take the first step in reopening by offering curbside service. One of them is the Public Library of Youngstown & Mahoning County. Director Aimee Fifarek talked about how their library services are evolving. 

A photo of Summa health
/ SUMMA HEALTH

A deal that would have seen Summa Health merge with one of Michigan's largest hospital systems has been canceled.

Coronavirus In Ohio: Families Weigh Risks Of Sending Loved Ones To Nursing Homes

May 29, 2020

In early March, just as Ohioans were learning about the first cases of novel coronavirus in the state, Anna Bondar’s grandfather fell at his Cleveland home. Luckily, the 92-year old, who lives with dementia, wasn’t injured badly.

The tight-knit family started to discuss the possibility of a nursing home, though they had serious reservations.

George Floyd protests in Columbus
Paul Becker / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 29:

Ohio is taking the first steps to lift the more than two month old ban on visits to some long-term care facilities. Officials says they want to expand this in stages.

photo of Coronavirus testing
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Ohio’s coronavirus testing rate is one of the worst in the country. Data compiled by Johns Hopkins University shows the per capita rate is about even with Texas and Kansas, and about one-quarter of Rhode Island’s, which tops the list.

Joe Biden
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Like just about everything else these days, political campaigning has had to rely on virtual connections. This week, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) held an organizing call to rally support in Ohio for Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential campaign.

Gov. Mike DeWine is beginning to loosen restrictions on assisted living facilities and homes for the developmentally disabled.

Starting June 8, residents at those two types of long-term care facilities can meet with visitors outdoors, the governor announced Thursday.

a photo of CVS in Kent
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Starting Friday CVS locations across Northeast Ohio will offer drive-thru coronavirus testing.

A photo of banners at Youngstown State University.
ASHTON MARRA / IDEASTREAM

Your morning headlines for Thursday, May 28:

Coronavirus testing in the U.S. has run into a number of snags, from a lack of nasal swabs to not enough chemicals needed to run the tests.

Now there's a new bottleneck emerging: A shortage of the machines that process the tests and give results.

Civilian labs and the Pentagon say they've had trouble getting the sophisticated, automated machines that can run hundreds of diagnostic tests at once. Three machine manufacturers — Hologic Inc., Roche and Abbott Laboratories — have confirmed to NPR that demand is outstripping supply.

A photo of Children's Akron campus
AKRON CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Health care providers locally and around the country are seeing a steep decline in the number of children being brought in for well visits.

Akron Children’s Hospital stopped offering well visits for children over the age of 3 in late March. Over the last two weeks it’s begun returning to full capacity.

Ohio leaders are condemning threats of violence made against Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes and her father, state Sen. Vernon Sykes, last weekend.

With most of Ohio’s businesses allowed to open up, experts who’ve worked with the state on the modeling it used to create its COVID-19 policies are evaluating their predictions for what’s ahead.

A Republican-backed bill to prohibit communities from banning plastic bags and other disposable containers passed the Senate on a mostly party line vote, after a significant change related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rubber Bowl beside Derby Downs
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 27:

Sanitizing large public spaces in the age of the coronavirus is coming down to drones. It may be a way to get fans in the stands sooner. It also could be an effective way to transport a vaccine to the masses once one becomes available. These and other applications have researchers scrambling to find pandemic-era drone applications.

Northeast Ohio’s community health centers are preparing to ramp up coronavirus testing efforts, with a focus on minority and high-risk populations.

COVID-19 Led To Shut Down Of Some Addiction Services

May 26, 2020

The isolation and stress brought on by COVID-19 have been particularly difficult for people fighting drug addiction.

When Ohio shut down in March to slow the spread of the coronavirus, nonprofits that offer services to people with substance use issues had to change the way they operate to keep the virus at bay.

MetroHealth, which operates an opioid safety office, also had to limit some services said Kelly Cioletti.

“With COVID 19 happening the way it did ... access to treatment, detox, all of that shut down,” Cioletti said.

Help covering rent and mortgage payments is coming to small businesses in Mentor under a new grant program designed to help reopen the local economy.

The Mentor Small Business Restart Program is focusing on small, local storefronts that had no opportunity to collect revenue during the shutdown, said Mentor’s Director of Economic Development and International Trade Kevin Malecek.

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