Community

JOUNSON CONTROLS HALL OF FAME VILLAGE WEBSITE

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, September 17:

Photo of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 16:

A collaborative art project in front of the Tree of Life synagogue site in Squirrel Hill has been installed. #HeartsTogether: The Art of Rebuilding, includes 101 images printed on a windscreen that stretches in front of the building along Wilkins Avenue. 

Picture of downtown Cleveland
WKSU

Today kicks off the first Welcoming Week in Cleveland. Hosted by Global Cleveland, the week offers a variety of events and special releases to celebrate immigrants in the community.

Joe Cimperman is the president of Global Cleveland. He says cities around the country have been doing these types of welcoming weeks, but this is the first one in Northeast Ohio.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, September 13:

Akron Fire Station 4
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

The city of Akron invited residents to have a look inside its two new fire stations at ribbon cutting ceremonies Thursday.

Residents got to see how the city is spending Issue 4 money at the fire stations in Middlebury and downtown.

Photo of lethal injection table
KEN PIORKOWSKI / FLICKR

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Sept. 12:

Graphic of uninsured rates by state in 2018
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 11: 

Sports Management Network Incorporated

If you’ve watched a Cleveland Cavaliers game on TV in the past 13 years, you likely heard the voice of Fred McLeod. The Cavs’ play-by-play announcer died suddenly on Monday. He was 67.  WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto said the longtime broadcaster was about to enter his 14th season with an organization that he loved.

ERIK DROST / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Browns have less than a week to regroup after their embarrassing season-opening loss to the Tennessee Titans. The team that's been hyped in the off-season was blown out by a score of 43-13. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto lists five things the Browns must fix heading into their Monday Night Football showdown on the road against the New York Jets. 

CALEB ARONHALT / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, September 10:

Medications
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 9:

a photo of a Vindicator newspaper box
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A digital news project in Youngstown says it won’t be chasing day-to-day stories. Editor Mark Sweetwood, formerly of The Vindicator, will lead the Mahoning Matters newsroom, staffed by two former Vindicator reporters.

Sweetwood says they will focus on topics people in the Youngstown region care about.

a photo of flooding on a highway
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION / FACEBOOK

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, September 6:

A photo of hands on jail bars.
SPAXIAX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, September 5:

photo of Juul
ANNA HUNTSMAN / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 4:

Erik Drost / Wikimedia Commons

Fans are pinning their hopes on a big season for the Cleveland Browns. The hype has been building since quarterback Baker Mayfield led the team’s turnaround last year. They’ve since added star wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. They open the season Sunday at home against the Tennessee Titans. 

Erik Drost / Wikimedia Commons

The Indians are in a battle for the postseason, currently in second place behind the Minnesota Twins in the American League Central Division. But WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says no matter how the season ends, it will be remembered as the year of Carlos Carrasco's comeback. 

From diagnosis to comeback
Carrasco, who's nicknamed "Cookie", has played for Cleveland for 10 seasons. The 32-year-old was the No. 2 starting pitcher entering the season. On June 5, the Indians announced that he was placed on the injured list with a blood condition.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson’s administration hopes to improve housing conditions by placing outreach workers with nonprofits across the city.

The $1 million program would fund 14 “engagement specialist” positions with community development corporations, the nonprofit groups that help with neighborhood planning and other local work. The engagement specialists would send letters to property owners and work with homeowners and landlords to fix up housing in need of repair. Cleveland would spend another $500,000 to pay residents back for repainting home exteriors.

Outside the All People's Fresh Market in Columbus.
Karen Kasler

The numbers of low-income people turning to food pantries for help are climbing. And with signs of trouble for the economy on the horizon, advocates at Ohio's 12 regional foodbanks and the hundreds of food pantries and soup kitchens that they serve are worried.

Illustration of wind speed probabilities forecast for Hurricane Dorian.
NOAA

As Hurricane Dorian heads toward the U.S., the American Red Cross is deploying local volunteers from Northeast Ohio to help in areas that could be affected.

The storm pummeled the Bahamas, causing widespread devastation and killing at least five people. Forecasters anticipate the hurricane will move toward the Florida coast late tonight.

Jim McIntyre, a spokesman for the Red Cross in Northeast Ohio, says it’s typical when disasters strike for local chapters across the country to band together and send volunteers.

a photo of Renee Pinsky with black and white cookies
CAROL FRIEDMAN / TEMPLE ISRAEL SISTERHOOD

A local organization is trying a new way to satisfy the community’s cravings for traditional Jewish food. Every other year, Temple Israel Sisterhood hosts the Art and Jewish Food Festival in Akron.

A photo of hands on jail bars.
SPAXIAX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, September 3:

Medications
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 2:

photo of Bob Saffold
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is honoring two men from Ohio who helped make Labor Day a national holiday more than a hundred years ago.

Ohio was the first state to recognize Labor Day in 1890 with a law sponsored by State Rep. John Patterson Green of Cleveland. Bob Saffold, a businessman and minister from Warrensville Heights and the stepfather of Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D-OH 11th district), said that idea influenced Ohio-born U.S. Senator James Henderson Kyle, who represented South Dakota in 1893.

Pages