Catherine Turcer

photo of lady justice
SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Even though judicial races are considered nonpartisan in Ohio, judicial campaigns are usually funded with campaign contributions. A government watchdog group’s report says once they’re on the bench, judges don’t recuse themselves when hearing a case involving those donors.

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Now that they’ve had success in changing the way the maps for lawmakers at the state and federal level are drawn, Ohio activists who worked on those ballot issues are turning their attention to other concerns.

Jen Miller from the League of Women Voters of Ohio says the Congressional redistricting issue that passed in the primary is still top of mind for her group.

KAREN KASLER / OPR

Voters overwhelmingly approved Issue 1, which changes the way the state’s Congressional district map will be drawn in 2021 and beyond.

It sets up new rules on splitting counties and increasing minority party input.

Issue 1 keeps the Congressional map drawing power with state lawmakers – though Republican legislators drew the current map, considered among the most gerrymandered in the country.

But for the ideal outcome a new map has to get 50 percent minority party approval.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The only statewide issue on the May primary ballot nearly didn’t make it – though it’s been talked about for decades. The long history of the complicated Issue 1, which some activists call a historic effort to change the way the map of Ohio’s Congressional districts is created.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Ohioans will vote May 8th on Issue 1, a plan to change the way Congressional districts are drawn in Ohio. 

The state is considered one of the most gerrymandered in the U.S. Issue 1 creates a bipartisan process for redrawing districts.

Catherine Turcer is executive director of Common Cause Ohio, one of the groups that, along with lawmakers, came up with the plan.

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