budget

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LINDSAY FOX / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Oct. 9:

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Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 19:

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Here are your morning headlines for July 18, 2019:

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CLEVELAND CLINIC

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 10:

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Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is entering week two of operations under a temporary budget plan after the Ohio House and Senate failed to reach a deal before the end of the fiscal year. Lawmakers said most Ohioans will continue business as usual, but state agencies have been directed to keep a close watch on their spending. 

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

There are a lot of differences that lawmakers are working out in the House and Senate versions of the two-year state budget. But one thing that’s in both – a lot more funding to pay for defense of very low-income defendants in county courts.

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LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, June 24:

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MULTISHARE / SHUTTERSTOCK

The Ohio House’s two year state budget repeals tax breaks for personal aircraft or private planes. Now Senators are being urged to remove that provision by an official from one of Ohio’s two companies offering part ownership of private jets.

The Executive Vice President of fractional jet company Net Jets, Bradley Ferrell urged senators to think twice.

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YOUR VOICE OHIO

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 9:

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House version of the state budget is expected to including some major changes, especially for small businesses.  

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) said he wants to trim the income tax deduction that many one-person businesses and partnerships can take on the first $250,000 of their incomes. That’s amounted to more than a billion dollars a year. Householder wants to pull that back to the first $100,000 of income. And he also wants to look at what he calls special cutouts – breaks that both conservative and liberal groups have called out as potentially costly.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, April 22:

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Governor Mike DeWine’s proposed budget includes a provision that would bring the state less revenue – but it’s not a tax cut. 

Raising the buying age from 18 to 21 statewide would cut down on the numbers of young people who start smoking, says Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton. But it could also help with infant mortality among young mothers, and could stop huge increases in the use of electronic cigarettes.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine is standing behind the numbers used to create his budget, as Republican House Speaker Larry Householder suggests he’s leaning toward more conservative numbers from the legislature’s economic analysts.  

Researchers for the Legislative Budget Office or LBO said they think the state will have half a billion dollars less in tax revenue for the two-year budget that starts in July than DeWine’s budget office has projected. And the LBO is suggesting lawmakers cut the spending increase in DeWine’s budget by 25 percent. But DeWine is confident in his spending plan.

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As the Ohio House prepares to hold hearings on Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed operating budget, Democratic members want to make sure their priorities are considered. Issues including a higher minimum wage, paid family leave, and health care security are all part of what the Dems call “Ohio Promise.” 

Democrats say their “Ohio Promise” Plan focuses on working families.

The House minority caucus is in an interesting position since half of Republican Speaker Larry Householder’s votes came from Democrats.

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LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 15:

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 14: 

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Feb. 11:

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UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, June 14:

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BROOKINGS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 5: 

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers have introduced their plan to spend more than $2.6 billion on capital improvements throughout Ohio. 

Republican Sen. Scott Oelslager says the new capital budget allows about $600 million for building new schools and around $483 million for colleges and universities. And he says it allocates new spending to deal with Ohio’s opioid crisis. 

IBERDROLA RENEWABLES

Lawmakers are about to take a long break after spending the last five months on the $65 billion budget, and leaders are already looking at what could be the next big issue in the Ohio House and Senate.

Lawmakers took out several energy-related provisions from the budget in exchange to revisit them later this year. 

That includes loosening the zoning restrictions on where wind turbines can be placed.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof expects to address that issue along with decreasing renewable energy standards.

Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The clock is ticking for Gov. John Kasich who has until Friday night to sign the $65 billion state budget that not only fills a revenue shortfall but makes some major policy changes. And there’s at least one change that could set the stage for a veto fight. 

The budget bill headed to Kasich’s desk cuts government spending across the board, gets rid of several funds that support local governments, reduces the number of tax brackets, and invests more than $175 million in the opioid epidemic.

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Statehouse News Bureau

State lawmakers are trying to hash out a final budget deal that they can send to the governor’s desk. This includes how they’ll spend money to fight the opioid epidemic while closing a more than $1 billion budget hole. There’s a big issue that looms over the discussion.

The largest chunk of state spending is Medicaid. 

But the Congressional health care debate includes talks of dramatically cutting federal funding for Medicaid and Medicaid expansion, the latter has enrolled more than 700,000 Ohioans.

The state wants to change to the way mental health and addiction services are billed and coded, to align with national standards. But providers of those services -- already stressed because of the opioid crisis --are very concerned. 

It’s expected the redesign of billing and coding for behavioral health services would expand access to treatment for people with mental illness and drug addiction.

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