An Akron Refugee Story

photo of Liz Schmidt
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A new report is showing how residents of Akron’s North Hill feel about their neighborhood – and what their vision is for its future.

photo of Dhan Tumbapoo
MADDIE MCGARVEY / HUFFINGTON POST

Akron owes its only population growth since the turn of the century to a kingdom on the other side of the Earth. As many as 5,000 Nepali people have made their way to the city during the last decade.

It’s been a dramatic change for people who had held onto their culture during centuries in Bhutan and decades in refugee camps in Nepal.

 

Tiffany Stacy and Paulina Subba
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editor's Note: This is the final installment in our week-long series looking at the impact of the Bhutanese refugees on Akron. It also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Sanchu Rai
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editors's note: This the fourth in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. This story also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Mongali Rai and Ash Maya Subba
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Editors's note: This is the third report in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. This story also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Dance class
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

EDITOR'S NOTE: This second part of a collaboration between WKSU and the Huffington Post focuses on the impact of Bhutanese refugees on the music of Akron.

Hindu Teej festival
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editors's note: This is the first report in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. Tomorrow, we’ll explore the fusion of music that is emerging.

HuffPost, in partnership with WKSU, presents a conversation with community leaders and experts about future plans for the decommissioned Inner-Belt Highway. The event at the Akron Art Museum will begin at 6 p.m. (doors at 5:30 p.m.) and is free and open to the public. Reserve your free ticket now through Evenbrite by clicking HERE.