Abortion ban

A photo of Peter Brown
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion, and oppose one of the most recent state restrictions on abortion.

photo of the U.S. Supreme Court
WIKIMEDIA

The U.S. Supreme Court will not take up a case on Alabama’s ban on an abortion method most commonly used in second trimester abortions. This means a lower court ruling saying the ban was unconstitutional will stand.  What does the high court’s decision mean for Ohio’s similar ban, which is in the courts right now?

Jaime Miracle of NARAL ProChoice Ohio said the decision in the Alabama case is a good sign for opponents of Ohio’s ban.

photo of supporters of legal abortion
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Supporters of legal abortion rallied in state capitals throughout the nation Tuesday. One such rally took place in Columbus.

Hundreds of protesters chanted outside the Statehouse. Many carried homemade signs, urging lawmakers to stop passing abortion bans and restrictions. Democratic Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) said the bans being passed lately are dangerous.

“People are going to still have abortions. They are going to because it’s a real health care need.”

A photo of the ACLU announcing their lawsuit over Ohio's lawsuit
SAM ABERLE / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

More than a month after Gov. Mike DeWine signed one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, a lawsuit has been filed in federal court to stop it from taking effect in July. It bans abortion as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

The bill bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat can be detected, often before a woman would even know she was pregnant. Jessie Hill, an attorney working with the ACLU, said the so-called “heartbeat bill” is blatantly unconstitutional.

photo of Ohio Senate
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate has passed the so-called “Heartbeat Bill” which bans an abortion when a viable heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks. Republican leaders expect a possible legal challenge.

Pro-choice groups have said if the “Heartbeat Bill” is signed into law, they plan to challenge it in court. This would likely result in a pricey court battle that could go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

photo of Ohio Statehouse cupola
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 20:

Students stand outside the Ohio Senate Chamber
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 15:

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MICHAEL RIVERA / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Feb. 16:

photo of handmaids and fetus tee advocates
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Department of Health statistics show the number of abortions in Ohio in 2016 was at an all-time low. That didn’t keep the legislature from passing more abortion legislation.

Ohio Right to Life is perhaps the most powerful lobby group at the Statehouse these days. The Republican dominated legislature has passed nearly two dozen bills that restricts abortions or funding for them. The latest was the Down Syndrome abortion bill which Gov. John Kasich signed into law Friday.

photo of Larry Obhof
OHIO SENATE

The Ohio Senate has passed another abortion ban – this one aimed at a specific prenatal diagnosis. 

By a nearly 2-1 vote,  majority Republicans approved the House- passed bill that would make it illegal for a doctor to perform an abortion after a Down Syndrome diagnosis. But Democratic Sen. Joe Schiavoni thinks it is a way to dissuade doctors from performing any abortions.

“This is another unconstitutional step toward taking a woman’s right to choose away.”

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, November 16th:

photo of Sen. Frank LaRose
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio could soon become the third state in the country to ban abortion after a diagnosis of Down syndrome. A bill to do that has passed the Senate.

Republican Frank LaRose of Hudson explained why he sponsored the Senate version of the ban.

“Do we want in the state of Ohio to have people making a decision that someone is less valuable because of a chromosomal disorder that they have?”

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An Ohio House committee has passed a bill that would make the state the third in the country to ban abortion after a Down Syndrome diagnosis has been made. Doctors who perform abortions after that point would be held liable and could lose their licenses to practice. 

After a long weekend, lawmakers will come back to the statehouse for hearings this week. And one will deal with a controversial abortion bill. 

photo of handmaids and fetus tee advocates
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill that would ban a common procedure used in most second trimester abortions is on its way to the full Ohio Senate. The legislation was voted out of committee this morning. But the vote didn’t come without some controversy.

Pro-choice protestors in costumes from the popular series "The Handmaid's Tale" were in the committee room, as they were for the first hearing. But this time, anti-abortion activists in tee shirts with pictures of fetuses sat in the front row while supporter Barry Sheets testified.

photo of Heartbeat Bill vigil
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A controversial abortion bill that Gov. Kasich vetoed at the end of last year has been reintroduced in the Ohio Legislature.

photo of Janet Folger Porter
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Supporters of a strict abortion ban that was vetoed by Gov. John Kasich are not giving up.

Janet Folger Porter has harsh words for lawmakers who didn’t come back into session to override Kasich’s veto of the so-called heartbeat bill.

“They literally chose to stay on vacation rather than override Kasich’s heartless veto of the heartbeat bill.”

Rep. Bob Cupp
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

The Ohio Legislature has passed the second abortion bill this week. It bans abortion at 20 weeks of gestation. 

The ban, which would prevent abortion at the point at which advocates say a fetus could feel pain, isn’t as unusual as the heartbeat bill passed earlier this week. Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and current Republican House member Bob Cupp says there are no questions about its constitutionality.