Morning Headlines: Summit County Unveils Fentanyl Testing Strips; Cavs to Re-sign Channing Frye

Jul 16, 2018

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 16:

  • Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips;
  • Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh donated to Richard Cordray;
  • Ohio approves legislation to honor Charles Follis;
  • Ohio State University president Michael Drake in top 10 highest paid among university presidents;
  • Akron kicks off Soap Box Derby;
  • Cleveland Cavaliers to re-sign Channing Frye;

Summit County unveils Fentanyl testing strips

Summit County has unveiled a test for drug users to find out if their drugs test positive for dangerous chemicals like fentanyl and carfentanyl. The Beacon Journal reports that in about 15 seconds the test-strips can show a positive or negative result for fentanyl or other synthetic opioids. For the job, Summit and other counties across the country are using repurposed test strips once used for urine-based drug tests. One official cautions that the tests aren’t 100 percent accurate because they are not being used as originally purposed. The fentanyl test strips — which cost about $1 each — are being paid for by Summit County Public Health and the ADM Board. Summit County needle exchange sites started offering the test strips last week.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh donated to Richard Cordray

President Donald Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court once donated money to the Ohio Democrat who is currently runnin g for governor. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh donated $250 to now-gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray's unsuccessful bid for state attorney general in 1998. The newspaper reports Kavanaugh also donated $1,000 to Cordray's failed bid for U.S. Senate in 2000. Cordray and Kavanaugh both worked at the law firm, Kirkland & Ellis, in Washington D.C. They both also clerked for retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy — though not at the same time. Kavanaugh also donated to many Republican candidates over the years. Cordray has criticized Kavanaugh's nomination saying the pick underscores the need for a governor who will "fight back against attempts to undermine our rights."

Ohio approves legislation to honor Charles Follis

The state has approved legislation that will create a day to honor: Charles Follis, the first documented, black professional football player, known by the nickname "the Black Cyclone." Gov. John Kasich signed the legislation designating Feb. 3 as Charles Follis Day. The Akron Beacon Journal reports Follis was born on Feb. 3, 1879, and grew up in Wooster — helping to organize the first varsity football team at his high school in 1899. After graduation, Follis played with an amateur Wooster team and in 1904 he signed a contract with the Shelby (Ohio) Blues of the American Professional Football Association. He suffered a career-ending injury a few years later and began playing baseball before he died from pneumonia in 1910 at age 31.

Ohio State University president in top 10 highest paid among public university presidents

Ohio State University President Michael Drake is one of the top 10 highest paid public university presidents, according to a new study. The Chronicle of Higher Education puts Drake's 2017 income at more than $1 million. That's well behind the top spot in the country; the University of Louisville president made more than $4 million last year. Elsewhere in Ohio, Miami University President Gregory Crawford made $570,000 in the same time period. He is the second highest paid public university president in Ohio.

Akron kicks off Soap Box Derby

Soap Box Derby week starts today in Akron. The Beacon Journal reports as many as 425 racers will compete in the All-American Soap box Derby at Derby Downs on Saturday. Most are from the U.S., but there are racers from Canada, Germany and Japan this year. Soap Box Derby is broken into three age groups between 7 and 20 years of age. Racers compete for college scholarships.

Cleveland Cavaliers to re-sign Channing Frye

The Cleveland Cavaliers plan to re-sign a familiar face to the roster, forward Channing Frye. According to multiple sources, Frye, who was traded by the Cavs in February to the Los Angeles Lakers, will get a $2.4 million contract. The 35-year-old spent parts of three seasons with Cleveland, winning the NBA championship with the Cavs in 2016. He was dealt at the trading deadline last season along with guard Isaiah Thomas for guard Jordan Clarkson and forward Larry Nance. Frye was a fan favorite and dependable role player in Cleveland for coach Ty Lue. The Cavs acquired him at the trade deadline in 2016. Frye is the first offseason signing for the Cavs since LeBron James left as a free agent for the Lakers.