Morning Headlines: Family of Murdered Akron Teen Asks Suspect to Surrender; VP to visit Lordstown

Jun 23, 2020

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 23:

  • Family of Akron teen shot and killed last week asking suspect to turn himself in
  • Ohio reports another daily spike in coronavirus cases
  • Cleveland Clinic announces cost-cutting measures to stem coronavirus-related losses
  • Cleveland Police say white man shouted racial slurs, tried to run over black teens at birthday party
  • Columbus Mayor to investigate allegations of man with disabilities maced by police
  • Ohio ask U.S. Supreme Court to keep signature rules in place
  • Mayor Horrigan releases report on diversity efforts; policies for city police
  • Vice President to tour Lordstown Motors on Thursday
  • FBI investigating possible civil rights violations by Put-in-Bay Police
  • Summit County gains funding to study Tuscarawas River flooding
  • Akron's Charter Review Commision to hold hearings tonight

Family of Akron teen shot and killed last week asking suspect to turn himself in
The family of a teen killed in Akron last week is asking for the suspect in the shooting to turn himself in. The Beacon Journal reports that the family of Na’kia Crawford is asking 17-year-old Adarus Black to do the right thing. He’s accused of shooting the 18-year-old North High School graduate at a stop light June 14 in what police are calling a case of mistaken identity. Two other suspects have been charged with obstructing justice. 24-year-old Janisha George has turned herself in, 18-year-old Jaion Bivins remains at large. The family says high profile attorney Ben Crump, who had offered his services when the shooting initially appeared racially motivated, has now distanced himself from the case.

Ohio reports another daily spike in coronavirus cases
The Ohio Department of Health is reporting another daily spike in coronavirus cases. Data released Monday shows 729 new cases. That’s the largest daily increase since 731 cases were reported on May 21. It follows other sharp increases in daily totals last week. Ohio is now reporting more than 45,500 confirmed and probable cases.

Cleveland Clinic announces cost-cutting measures to stem coronavirus-related losses
Ohio’s largest employer has announced wide ranging cost-cutting measures in the wake of the virus driven economic slow-down. Cleveland.com reports that Cleveland Clinic is facing a $500 million loss in revenue due to the pandemic. The hospital system has nearly 51,000 Ohio employees. The Clinic is eliminating raises, freezing some expansion projects, and restricting travel and vacation time. The system has spent about $100 million for COVID-19 preparedness.

Cleveland Police say white man shouted racial slurs, tried to run over black teens at birthday party
Cleveland Police say over the weekend a white man shouted racial slurs and drove into a group of Black teenagers. No one was hurt. Cleveland.com reports police are investigating the incident as a hate crime. In the Brooklyn Centre neighborhood Sunday, police say 50-year-old Rickey Adkins drove onto the front lawn of a birthday party and tried to hit a group of teens. Police say Adkins then drove by several more times, yelled a racial slur and then tried to hit several more teens and one adult. Police have charged Adkins with felonious assault.

Columbus Mayor to investigate allegations of man with disabilities maced by police
The mayor of Ohio's capital city says police are investigating allegations that officers maced a man with disabilities during a weekend rally. Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther is encouraging people with video and photos of the incident to submit them to police. A viral video shows a man without legs curled on the sidewalk as passers-by care for him and call for medical help. Activists say the police forcibly removed his prosthetic legs. Ginther says the city is taking the matter seriously. Police used the chemical spray Sunday afternoon after they say protesters moved from sidewalks to the street in downtown Columbus. A police spokesman said demonstrators were acting illegally.

Ohio ask U.S. Supreme Court to keep signature rules in place
Ohio continues to defend its right to impose normal signature requirements on ballot issue campaigns amid the global pandemic. Uncertainty over the question prompted backers to suspend a voting-rights campaign last week. Minimum wage and marijuana decriminalization issues remain. Attorney General Dave Yost’s attorneys told the U.S. Supreme Court in a filing Monday that a lower court judge who temporarily relaxed Ohio's signature-gathering rules “rewrote Ohio’s Constitution and Revised Code.” The state also argues changing the rules now would lead to “last-minute confusion.” Some of the delay has been caused by Yost’s litigation taking the issue to the U-S Supreme Court itself.

Mayor Horrigan releases report on diversity efforts; policies for city police
Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan has released a report on the city's diversity and inclusion efforts. The report includes policies for the city's police including rules on use of force, racial profiling and body cams. In a release, Horrigan says the report is not a “mission accomplished checklist,” but part of an ongoing effort to create a more equitable city and to be more transparent with residents. Akron and cities across Ohio and the country have seen protests in recent weeks over the police injustice and the killing of George Floyd in Minnesota.

Vice President to tour Lordstown Motors on Thursday
Vice President Mike Pence will be in Lordstown Thursday attending the unveiling of an all new electric vehicle. Lordstown Motors is showcasing its new fully electric pickup truck called “the endurance.” The Tribune Chronicle reports Pence is expected to tour the facility ahead of a meeting with local law enforcement and community leaders.  The local economy in Lordstown took a huge hit last year when General Motors shuttered its Chevy Cruz production plant. Lordstown Motors claims its plant will have the capacity to produce 420-thousand vehicles annually. Its C-E-O has said he wants to turn the Mahoning Valley into a hub for electric vehicle production -dubbed the “voltage valley.”

FBI investigating possible civil rights violations by Put-in-Bay Police
The FBI has subpoenaed records from the Put-in-Bay Police. The Sandusky Register reports federal officials are looking into possible civil rights violations by island police. On May 24 a Put-in-Bay officer allegedly threw a black woman to the ground during an arrest. On June 6 several officers arrested nine Sandusky residents, most of whom are black after a traffic stop involving a golf cart. The Put-in-Bay village council voted to hire an outside agency to hold its own investigation, but the Sandusky Register also reports no decision has been made on who would actually lead that investigation.

Summit County gains funding to study Tuscarawas River flooding
Summit County has received federal funding to study flooding along the Tuscarawas River. The Beacon Journal reports Congressman Anthony Gonzalez has announced $390-thosuand in funding for studies being led by the U-S Army Corps of Engineers. Gonzalez called the studies are a key first step in reducing flooding in the area. Last year storms led to devastating flooding in Norton, Barberton, New Franklin and other parts of southern Summit County.

Akron's Charter Review Commision to hold hearings tonight
The City of Akron's Special Charter Review Commission is holding a special meeting tonight via Zoom and streaming on its YouTube Channel -complete with a public comment period. The meeting is tonight at 5 p.m. Akron revises its charter once a decade.  Registration is required by noon today to participate in the public hearing by contacting the Akron Law Department's Civil Division or emailing charterreview2020@akron.gov.