Morning Headlines: Dru Joyce Classic Moves to Cleveland; Ohio to Test Drinking Water for Chemicals

Dec 3, 2019

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Dec. 3:

  • Dru Joyce Classic moves to Cleveland;
  • Ohio to test drinking water for chemicals;
  • DeWine unveils simplified pardon process;
  • Cuyahoga County Council votes down proposed levy for HHS;
  • Mother pleads guilty in connection with 2016 Ohio slayings;
  • State patrol: 15 killed on Ohio roadways over Thanskgiving holiday;
  • Ohio delays new law requiring home inspectors to be licensed;

Dru Joyce Classic moves to Cleveland
A basketball tournament that attracts thousands of athletes and spectators from around to world to Akron is moving to Cleveland next year. The Dru Joyce Classic will be held at the Cleveland I-X Center in April. The move will allow all the games to be played under one roof for the first time. The I-X Center has 58 courts whereas in Akron, the tournament was played in 50 venues throughout the region. The Dru Joyce Classic has brought in around $5 million each year to Akron's economy since 2003. Dru Joyce coached LeBron James at St. Vincent-St. Mary High School in Akron.

Ohio to test drinking water for chemicals
Gov. Mike DeWine has announced a plan to test for potentially harmful chemicals in the state's drinking water. The manmade chemicals known as PFAS have been turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S. The chemicals are used in products ranging from carpeting, cookware, microwave popcorn bags and firefighting foam. If the chemicals are detected, the EPA will work with public systems to reduce their levels, and the Health Department will work with private water system owners. The state hopes to complete sampling of public water systems by the end of next year.

DeWine unveils simplified pardon process
Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is preparing to announce a pardon process for certain inmates he promises will be simpler and faster. The Ohio Governor’s Expedited Pardon Project targets individuals who have demonstrated they are now contributing members of society. DeWine plans his announcement Tuesday at the Ohio State law school in a presentation with the head of the state's prison system.

Cuyahoga County Council votes down proposed levy for HHS
Cuyahoga County Council has denied a proposed amendment that would have allowed voters to decide on a tax levy increase for Health and Human Services. Crain's Cleveland reports council members said the proposal lacked detail on what programs the levy would fund. The new proposed levy increase would have raised an additional $35 million annually. The current levy generates $104 million a year. The levy will once again go before the council before the ballot filing deadline in two weeks.

Mother pleads guilty in connection with 2016 Ohio slayings
The mother of one of four people charged in the 2016 slayings of eight family members in Ohio has pleaded guilty to charges related to the investigation. Rita Newcomb, 66, pleaded guilty Monday to obstructing official business after prosecutors agreed to drop forgery, obstructing justice and perjury charges against her. She isn't accused in the Rhoden family killings, but prosecutors have said the charges against her arose from the investigation into the slayings in southern Ohio. Newcomb’s daughter, son-in-law and two grandsons are accused of carrying out the killings. All four have pleaded not guilty.

State patrol: 15 killed on Ohio roadways over Thanskgiving holiday
Ohio's State Highway Patrol said early data shows 15 people were killed on the state's roadways over this year's Thanksgiving holiday period. The patrol said the 15 were killed in 13 crashes. The reporting period was from 12 a.m. Wednesday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday. The patrol said seven people were killed in seven crashes over the Thanksgiving holiday period in 2018. The 2019 statistics will be finalized later. Of the 15 fatalities reported, two were pedestrians and two weren't wearing a seat belt. Two of the deaths also involved impaired driving.

Ohio delays new law requiring home inspectors to be licensed
The state has delayed a new law that requires home inspectors in Ohio to be licensed. The Columbus Dispatch reports the law will now take effect April 5. State lawmakers approved the legislation in January, and the law had been expected to take effect on Nov. 1. It establishes education and skill requirements and requires applicants to pass a criminal background check. The superintendent of the Ohio Division of Real Estate and Professional Licensing says the delay has left many newcomers to the field in a state of limbo, but Superintendent Anne Petit says inspectors can continue to work while the details are being decided.