Morning Headlines: Diebold Announces Job Cuts; Judges Order Ohio to Let Purged Voters Back In

Nov 1, 2018

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Nov. 1:

  • Diebold announces global job cuts, third-quarter losses;
  • Federal judges order Ohio to allow purged voters back in;
  • Report: Cleveland has second-highest premature birth rate;
  • Goodyear investment outlook goes from stable to negative;
  • Pence decries immigrant caravan during Ohio campaign stop;
  • Steubenville diocese releases names of accused priests;
  • Court: Ex-Notre Dame player's widow can sue over concussions;
  • Akron Children's CEO to step down;
  • Politicians to join last-minute rallies for Ohio candidates;
  • Two officials face penalities for Hopkins Airport security breach;

Diebold announces global job cuts, third-quarter losses
Summit County-based banking technology company Diebold Nixdorf has announced its third quarter results with plans to cut 1,600 jobs globally. The cuts are a part of the company’s DN Now improvement program, which is expected to generate savings of $250 million by 2021. Diebold Nixdorf reports it lost $212 million in the third quarter and expects a loss of $520 million for the year.

Federal judges order Ohio to allow purged voters back in
Federal judges have ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year's election. A divided 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel granted an emergency motion sought by voting-rights groups. The ruling overturned in part an Oct. 10 ruling by a federal judge that said voters haven't been illegally purged from Ohio's rolls. Plaintiffs led by the A. Philip Randolph Institute in June lost their broader challenge to Ohio's election administration process as unconstitutional when the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of Ohio's practices. But they continued to challenge the confirmation notices the state sent to voters that set off the process of removing them from county voter rolls after not voting in three federal elections or taking other voting-related actions. Secretary of State Jon Husted said he wouldn't fight the order with five days until the election.

Goodyear investment outlook goes from stable to negative
The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company’s investment outlook has gone from stable to negative. Moody’s Investors Services expects Goodyear to have weak cash flow for the next year because of high raw material costs. Despite the outlook, Moody’s says the Akron tire maker will maintain a strong global competitive position and will be able to borrow money to make up for some of the high material costs. 

Pence decries immigrant caravan during Ohio campaign stop
Vice President Mike Pence said the caravan of Central Americans walking toward the U.S. southern border "is an assault on our country" during a campaign appearance for Ohio Republican candidates. Pence was accompanied by Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, for a rally attended by several hundred people Wednesday inside a hangar at an airport in Mansfield. Pence was joined on stage by Republican gubernatorial candidate Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, U.S. Senate candidate Rep. Jim Renacci, Rep. Bob Gibbs and Rep. Troy Balderson. DeWine is in a close race with Democrat Richard Cordray. Balderson is also in a tight race with Democrat Danny O'Connor, who narrowly lost to Balderson in an August special election.

Steubenville diocese releases names of accused priests
An Ohio Roman Catholic diocese has released the names of 16 priests and one seminarian who it says have been credibly accused or have admitted to sexually abusing minors. The Diocese of Steubenville in southeast Ohio said Wednesday most of the accusations are decades old. A spokesman said last month it would release names dating back to its formation in 1944. The release comes a day after a priest who ministered at two diocesan parishes appeared in court on sexual battery charges for a relationship with an underage girl. The Diocese of Youngstown released a list of 34 accused priests Tuesday.

Court: Ex-Notre Dame player's widow can sue over concussions
The Ohio Supreme Court says the widow of a former University of Notre Dame football player can sue the school and the NCAA over allegations her husband was disabled by concussions during his college playing days in the 1970s. Steve and Yvette Schmitz filed a lawsuit in 2014 alleging the institutions showed "reckless disregard" for player safety and failed to protect them from concussions. Steve Schmitz died in 2015. The lawsuit said the Cleveland Clinic diagnosed him with a brain disease related to numerous concussions. The NCAA and Notre Dame argued too much time has passed to allow the lawsuit to proceed. The Supreme Court Wednesday returned the case to the trial court.

Akron Children's CEO to step down
The long-term leader of Akron Children’s Hospital has announced he’s stepping down. The Beacon Journal reports that, after 40 years as CEO, Bill Considine is handing over the reins to president Grace Wakulchik effective today. Considine will serve as CEO emeritus through next year, focusing on child advocacy issues. Wakulchik becomes only the 3rd Akron Children’s CEO since 1944 – the hospital dates back to 1890 but leaders bore other names. Wakulchik, a registered nurse who has been at Children’s 26 years says she will work to build on Considine’s legacy.

Politicians to join last-minute rallies for Ohio candidates
Ohio candidates are getting more political star power in the final days of campaigning. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren will hold ralles today at Ohio State and Ohio University for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray. Then, the Democratic ticket gets a visit from former Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday at Valley Forge High School in Parma Heights. Monday, President Trump will hold a rally at the IX center for Republican candidates.

Two officials face penalities for Hopkins Airport security breach
The city of Cleveland says two top officials could face fines or prosecution following a security breach last week at Cleveland Hopkins Airport. Assistant Airport Director Fred Szabo and Chief of Operations Darnell Brown could be subject to fines following a TSA investigation. Both remain suspended without pay. The mayor’s office has not provided details about the security incident at the city-run airport, but Cleveland.com reports it involved bypassing a TSA checkpoint.