Tim Rudell

Senior Reporter

Tim Rudell has worked in broadcasting and news since his student days at Kent State in the late 1960s and early 1970s (when he earned extra money as a stringer for UPI). He began full time in radio news in 1972 in his home town of Canton, OH.  

In 1976 he moved to television and for the next dozen years did double duty as an anchorman and the news director for TV stations including the NBC affiliates in Youngstown, OH, Grand Rapids, MI, and Buffalo, NY. He then became Vice President of Consulting, and later Executive Vice President for one of the TV industry's leading research and consulting firms, Reymer & Gersin, Associates, with direct consulting assignments including newsrooms  in New York, Los Angles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Kansas City,.

In the 1990s, he was Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief for TVDirect, a joint venture of The Associated Press and Conus Communications that provided live and custom reporting from the nation's capital. Later he was promoted to Senior Vice President and division General Manager of Conus Washington, and eventually to Executive Vice President of Conus.  He then move over to the AP to become a member of the senior management of Associated Press Television News, responsible for advancing APTN's downstream businesses in North America. 

From 2004 through the end of 2008 he was Managing General Partner and CEO of a Washington area consulting group including Media Services Co. of America, and Independent Business Advisors of Virginia.  

In 2009 Tim and wife Fran decided  to return to their roots in northeast Ohio: "to go home, and do some things we wanted to do." He joined WKSU and became a reporter again, resuming the role that originally drew him to news.  

Ways to Connect

Portage Path walkers
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The traditional clothing, music and dance of the first people of America were a part of the third annual “Walk of The Portage Path” Monday in Akron. 

The march, along Portage Path from Highland Square to the Perkins Mansion, drew several hundred participants.  It is the concluding event of a four-day celebration of the First-People of Akron and Summit County.  The Portage Path Collaborative—including the Summit County Historical Society—puts it on each year. 

Mogadore Reservoir near the dam
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The 2018 midterm election is a few weeks away. Investing in America’s infrastructure is a major emerging issue.  As it was right before another midterm nearly a century ago, when much of what needs rebuilding today was first put in place.


Pills from presciption bottle
FDA website

A change in federal law to keep consumers from being left in the dark about prescription drug pricing is on President Donald Trump’ desk.  And, he’s expected to sign it.  

It is rare for Republicans and Democrats to agree in Washington; rarer still for something to pass the Senate unanimously and the House on a voice vote. But this legislation did.

It stops insurance industry middlemen known as prescription benefits managers from writing gag orders into contracts with retailers--gag orders forbidding pharmacists from telling customers about low cost medication options.

Headquarters building, Diebold Nixdorf
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Northeast Ohio-based banking technology company Diebold Nixdorf will be cutting some jobs across its worldwide work force.  But its new CEO says that may not mean an overall reduction in the company’s employee headcount. 

Gerrard Schmid took over at financially ailing Diebold Nixdorf in February. He says a key factor in getting back on track is maximizing efficiency in serving customers.  

Walsh University symposium September 25, 2018
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Improving results in addiction and mental health treatment was the goal of an all-day gathering Tuesday at Walsh University in North Canton. 

The event title was called “Breaking the Stigma.”  A common theme of the presentations was that, along with better public understanding of what mental health and addiction issues really are, treatment is becoming more focused and more effective. 

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