Karen Kasler

Ohio Public Radio and TV Statehouse Bureau Chief

Karen is a lifelong Ohioan who has served as news director at WCBE-FM, assignment editor/overnight anchor at WBNS-TV, and afternoon drive anchor/assignment editor in WTAM-AM in Cleveland. In addition to her daily reporting for Ohio’s public radio stations, she’s reported for NPR, the BBC, ABC Radio News and other news outlets.  She hosts and produces the Statehouse News Bureau’s weekly TV show “The State of Ohio”, which airs on PBS stations statewide. She’s also a frequent guest on WOSU TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, a regular panelist on “The Sound of Ideas” on ideastream in Cleveland, appeared on the inaugural edition of “Face the State” on WBNS-TV and occasionally reports for “PBS Newshour”. She’s often called to moderate debates, including the Columbus Metropolitan Club’s Issue 3/legal marijuana debate and its pre-primary mayoral debate, and the City Club of Cleveland’s US Senate debate in 2012.

Karen is a graduate of Otterbein College, and earned her Master’s as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University. Karen has been honored by the Associated Press, the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences/Ohio Valley Emmys, and holds a National Headliner Award. 

Ways to Connect

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Two public school districts say Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine shouldn’t handle the state’s lawsuit seeking to recover millions of dollars from the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. The districts are asking a Franklin County court if they can take over the lawsuit against the now-closed online charter school.

Manufacturing
WIKIMEDIA / WIKIMEDIA

The state’s jobless rate last month was unchanged from July.  But that’s mixed news to some who watch the economy.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich talked about one of his favorite subjects – partnering with community colleges to develop workers’ high tech skills – as he opened the Midwestern Governors Association workforce summit Wednesday.  He also talked about what he said won’t be changing when it comes to Ohio’s workforce.

The Republican gubernatorial ticket wants to bring together business and technology entrepreneurs to advise the state on creating high-tech jobs and improving state services. But as Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports, right now that won’t help more than a million people who don’t have high speed internet in their homes. One in 11 Ohioans have no access to reliable, affordable broadband, including a third of the state’s rural residents, but also thousands of people in the state’s biggest cities.

photo of Abraham Joy
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A dozen high-tech ideas for fighting the opioid crisis have each been awarded $200,000 from Ohio’s Third Frontier fund. The winners were picked in a contest that Gov. John Kasich proposed, and there’s still a final round of cash to come.

The concepts include apps connecting people to treatment and wraparound services, a screening test for health care providers, and equipment to help with opioid withdrawal. Brian Carrico with Indiana-based Innovation Health Solutions created a device that blocks brain signals that trigger withdrawal symptoms by over 80 percent.

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