Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Gov. Kasich and top lawmakers
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers passed their fair share of far-reaching and controversial bills in 2015. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports that the budget was perhaps the most extensive measure passed last year.

 

The budget was certainly the biggest measure passed in 2015 in terms of size and scope. Republican Senate President Keith Faber touted the part of that plan that cut income taxes 6.3 percent across the board for individuals and eliminated the tax burden for businesses earning less than $250,000.

photo of Catherine Turcer
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It will be a few years yet before Ohioans see how a constitutional change in the way state legislative districts are drawn plays out.  Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles examines what might be ahead on the issue.

Issue 1, the Statehouse redistricting proposal, was endorsed by Republicans, Democrats, independents, good government groups and more. In fact, there wasn’t an organized campaign against it. The campaign to add more bipartisan input to the way Ohio draws boundary lines for state House and Senate districts was somewhat boring.

photo of Buddie
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Plans to legalize marijuana in Ohio were derailed by voters in 2015. But as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, the failed ballot issue this November that would have allowed it is not the end of the story.

The ResponsibleOhio plan would have made Ohio the first to legalize recreational and medical marijuana with one vote. The plan for ten investor-owned growing sites was rejected by 64% of voters, and with more than 20 million dollars was spent by supporters, that amounted to about $17 per vote. But ResponsibleOhio's Ian James says the investors want to go back to the ballot.

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

If you are purchasing a puppy from an online dog breeder, Ohio’s Attorney General warns to proceed with caution. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers are introducing a bill to require women who have abortions or miscarriages to designate arrangements for burial or cremation of fetuses. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Attorney General Mike DeWine found no evidence that Planned Parenthood of Ohio was selling body parts of aborted fetuses as had been alleged in a viral video. But that doesn’t make Republican State Rep. Kyle Koehler feel any better.

“Whether they are selling body parts or simply tossing them into landfills doesn’t matter to me anymore.”

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