Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Brian Garrett
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A man who says he was abused by former Ohio State University doctor Richard Strauss in the 1990s wants state lawmakers to get rid of the time limit to file legal claims of sexual abuse.

photo of lady justice
SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Even though judicial races are considered nonpartisan in Ohio, judicial campaigns are usually funded with campaign contributions. A government watchdog group’s report says once they’re on the bench, judges don’t recuse themselves when hearing a case involving those donors.

photo of empty wallet
SHUTTERSTOCK

Ohio receives more than $727 million from the federal government each year that the state’s poorest families can use for things they need. But a new report shows a lot of that cash assistance isn’t making it to those families.

A composite image of two abortion protests.
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

At least 18 abortion restrictions have been put into place in Ohio since Gov. John Kasich took office in 2011. There are fewer abortion clinics now versus then. Yet the new abortion report compiled by the state shows the number of abortions actually increased last year. 

The Ohio Health Department’s 2017 Abortion report says the number of Ohio women getting abortions increased by one percent over the previous year. 

“It’s a tragedy to see the abortion numbers go up in Ohio," said Ohio Right to Life’s Jamison Weaver.

photo of Mike Brickner
ANDY CHOW / OPR

A coalition of voting rights groups says reforms are needed to the state’s election process to encourage voting and eliminate problems that keep voters from being able to cast ballots. 

A court order mandating weeknight and weekend voting hours statewide will expire next year.

Mike Brickner is working with the group All Voting is Local - which is urging the next Secretary of State to make those extended hours permanent. And that’s not all.

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