Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

Photo of Prison Bars
SHUTTERSTOCK

There is one statewide issue on the ballot in this November’s election.  Issue 1 proposes to reduce prison overcrowding in Ohio by reducing the sentences of non-violent, low-level drug offenders.  Opponents argue, among other things, that it would make it harder to prosecute drug traffickers and take away power from judges to sentence or seek rehab where appropriate.

Now, the state budget office has said if it passes, it will cost local communities more money.

Photo of marijuana leaves
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Several large and small cultivators of marijuana for Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program say they plan to be harvesting their products soon. That doesn’t mean patients will be able to buy it anytime soon.

Stephanie Gostomski with the Ohio Department of Commerce says marijuana growers won’t be able to do anything with their harvest for a while. 

photo of chronic pain patients protests
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. Many patients who suffer from chronic pain say the new rules are leaving them without pain relief, resulting in unintended consequences.

JO INGLES / Statehouse News Bureau

The Human Rights Campaign estimates there are 1.8 million LGBTQ Ohioans and their allies. A campaign is underway to get those voters to the polls next month, with key statewide races and Ohio’s Congressional delegation on the ballot.

The latest fundraising numbers show this year’s race for governor is going to be the most expensive in the state’s history.

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