Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

empty street
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Americans are adjusting to life without social interaction. It’s been more than two weeks since bars, restaurants and schools closed in Ohio.

We still don't know how long it will be before nonessential businesses reopen and residents can travel freely. 

President Donald Trump recently extended his stay-at-home recommendations through the end of April.

dr brian harte
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

New models show a wave of coronavirus cases could be headed our way in Northeast Ohio.

The Cleveland Clinic’s latest estimates show the outbreak will peak in early May and could cause up to 10,000 new COVID-19 cases per day.

It’s a sobering picture, but our local hospitals are gearing up for the surge.

picture of coronavirus
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Back in school we memorized the parts of a cell: the cell wall, nucleus, Golgi bodies, lots of stuff.

But a virus is different. It's on the border of a living and nonliving collection of molecules, mostly proteins and a string of RNA or DNA. It doesn't eat or sleep; it's sole function is to parasitize its host cell and make copies of itself. 

patricia stoddard dare
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Congress has passed a coronavirus response package that includes paid sick leave for workers in mid-sized companies that don’t already provide it.

President Donald Trump has signed the measure into law.

It’s a temporary response to the COVID-19 crisis, but paid sick leave has long been of interest to Patricia Stoddard Dare, a professor of Social Work at Cleveland State University.

She recently spoke with WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair about why we need it now.

a photo of a test kit
CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The number of cases of COVID-19 continues to grow in Ohio and the state health director said Thursday it is likely more than 100,000 people in the state are carrying the virus. 

girls in classroom
DOWNIE PHOTOGRAPHY / LAUREL SCHOOL

Girls today are under enormous pressure.

Pressures from social media, sexism, school, sports, peers. All of it has made what should be an exuberant time of life overwhelmed with stress and anxiety.

Researchers in Cleveland are finding ways to help teens manage stress and other issues.

In this week’s Exploradio, we meet the women behind the country’s first school-based center for research on girls.

a photo of a woman with recycling bin
JOE GUNDERMAN / WKSU

Changes in international markets along with skyrocketing processing costs have thrown the industry into a tailspin.

In this first installment of our series Reduce, Reuse, Refocus, we sort through the confusion about recycling. 

Tim Ryan and LGChem executives
MICHAEL ZETTS

A delegation of Korean executives from LG Chem met in Washington, D.C., Wednesday with state and federal officials to lay the groundwork for a new electric vehicle battery factory in Lordstown.

Congressman Tim Ryan (D - Niles), along with Ohio lawmakers, Sen. Michael Rulli ( R - Salem) and Sen. Sean O'Brien (D - Trumbull), praised the investments being made in the Mahoning Valley by the battery maker and its partner General Motors Corp.

photo of Ethan Krauss
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

America has a long tradition of the lone inventor, and Ohio has long been a leader in aerospace innovation.

An inventor in Oberlin combines the two by creating a new form of aircraft in his backyard.

On this week’s Exploradio, we look at the quest for a flying machine with no moving parts.

a photo of a classroom
SHUTTERSTOCK

This is the week that advocates for school choice are highlighting alternatives to traditional public schools.

One choice that may be available to a growing number of parents is a voucher to use public money to pay for private education.

That expansion of Ohio’s EdChoice voucher program could devastate public school budgets unless lawmakers take action this week.

CHRIS CHARTIER / ASHLAND UNIVERSITY

First impressions can have lasting consequences.

New research is delving into how we evaluate a stranger’s face, and pass judgments based on fleeting impressions.

A new, worldwide collaborative started at Ashland University is helping explain that process, and tackle other questions.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how the Psychological Science Accelerator is putting a new face on how science is done.

photo of student climate protest in Cleveland
CHLOE FRIEDLAND

This story was originally published on July 22, 2019.

Fifty years ago a burning river mobilized a generation of environmental activism. Citizens pushed for new laws to regulate pollution, and our water and air has gotten cleaner.

But significant environmental challenges remain including climate change, habitat loss, and plastics pollution.

Our series Watershed looks at today’s environmental warriors and the road ahead.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

This story was originally published on June 3, 2019.

WKSU asked listeners for ideas for what to explore in the next episode of our Exploradio science series.

We had some great suggestions. When the ideas were put to a vote, the top choice was –

“Is enough being done to find a cure for type-1 diabetes?”

In this week’s Exploradio, we try to find the answer.

CMNH

A Cleveland researcher has been named to the list of “10 People Who Mattered in Science” for 2019 by the prestigious journal Nature.

photo of mahmood ghannoum
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

There is an ecosystem living inside of us that scientists are only beginning to comprehend.

Our microbiome aids in digestion and metabolism, but when out of whack, can cause discomfort, disease… even depression.

In this week’s Exploradio, we meet researchers in Cleveland who are working toward a better understanding of how to have a happy gut.

Bernie Moreno
CODY YORK

Ohio car-buyers could soon have the option of receiving digital titles according to Lt. Gov. Jon Husted.

Husted made the announcement earlier this week at the Blockland Solutions Conference in Cleveland, an event promoting blockchain technology.

Husted is head of a new working group called InnovateOhio, which identified the Bureau of Motor Vehicles as an agency ripe for innovation.

Conference organizer Bernie Moreno has formed a company that uses secure blockchain technology to provide digital titles.

City Block

One of the organizers of a tech conference in Cleveland says the redevelopment of Tower City's retail space is moving forward.

Bernie Moreno is founder of the Blockland Solutions Conference taking place this week.

He says property owner Bedrock Detroit is committed to converting the failed Avenue at Tower City shopping complex into a business incubator.

dr. john langell
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Northeast Ohio Medical University’s new president is no stranger to innovation.

Dr. John Langell is not only a surgeon, he’s an inventor with more than a dozen patents.

Langell’s last job, before taking the reins last month at NEOMED, was head of the University of Utah’s Center for Medical Innovation.

We joined Langell in a tour of NEOMED’s newest expansion.

david cooperrider
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Cleveland’s greatest export may not be world-class healthcare, auto parts, or even LeBron James, it might be a management philosophy.

Appreciative Inquiry was invented at Case Western Reserve University three decades ago and has become a transformative tool for companies and organizations around the world.

The process was used recently to help create a new vision for Cleveland.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look into the science of positive planning.

The pond in front of the Cleveland Museum of Art  is seen from above.
JEFF ST. CLAIR / WKSU

An effort to shape the economic future of Cleveland continues following a large-scale brainstorming session.

Six hundred people gathered last week at the Cleveland Rising Summit.

Don Graves, an executive with Key Bank, was one of the organizers.

He says ideas coalesced around improving transportation, access to the Lakefront, inclusion and racial equity, and boosting business growth.

Graves says libraries will host sessions over the next few weeks for those who want to share additional input.

a photo of several groups at tables
JEFF ST. CLAIR / WKSU

An initiative kicked off Tuesday in Cleveland to develop a new vision for the city’s future.

The Cleveland Rising Summit is a three day event that draws together a large group of citizens to brainstorm.

The process is led, in part, by Case Western Reserve University professor David Cooperrider, developer of a technique to facilitate innovation in businesses and community groups.

a photo of Lucy
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The discoverer of the famous Lucy fossil has returned to Cleveland for a sold-out talk.

Donald Johanson was a curator of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History when, in 1974, he led the team that made the discovery of the ancient human ancestor.

He’s currently head of the Institute for Human Origins at the University of Arizona.

a photo of John Nicholas and Stan Smith
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Like death and taxes, being hit by a computer virus seems inevitable.

Cybercrime took a $100 billion bite out of the U.S. economy last year alone.

It’s not just individuals who are hacked. Cities, schools and small businesses are increasingly targeted.

In this week’s Exploradio, a look at local efforts to fight the onslaught by training the next generation of cyber warriors.

Kelly Kendrick is IT director at Coventry Local Schools, a small district south of Akron.

computers
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The Ohio House last week approved the creation of a civilian force of ‘cyber-warriors.’

The bill is now headed back to the Senate for a final vote to establish the Ohio Cyber Reserve.

amish farmer with horses
DOYLE YODER / USED WITH PERMISSION

The Amish are an anachronism in modern America.

They don’t own cars, they’re not on the grid, but researchers at the College of Wooster find that the Amish relationship with technology is more nuanced than it appears at first glance, and doesn’t always fit our stereotypes.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look at the complexities of Amish life in the 21st century.

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