Carter Adams

News Intern

Credit NATE MANLEY

Carter is a senior journalism student at Kent State University and multimedia intern with WKSU. His concentration is in documentary photography, focusing on political unrest and working-class issues. He has worked on stories both local and abroad, having covered the 2016 Republican National Convention and the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in the Florida Keys.

photo of Afkham Davis protesting the prospect of War with Iran
ROGER INGLES

Following an Iranian attack on Iraqi airbases housing U.S. troops, President Trump stopped short of declaring immediate military action—announcing instead new sanctions against Iran.

The President stated he was open to embracing peace, “with all who seek it.”

The administration planned a Senate briefing Wednesday afternoon. 

Senator Sherrod Brown says Congress has a role to play if any military action is taken against Iran.

A bicycle mounted Cleveland police officer rides along the street during an inaguration day protest in downtown Cleveland. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

The Cleveland Police Department is taking new measures to standardize the department’s response to incidents domestic violence. The new initiative expands on previous programs and looks to standardize domestic violence investigations.

All officers are now using the Domestic Abuse-Law Enforcement, or DALE, assessment. It includes a series of 11 questions that help officers determine whether a victim is at high risk.

These include questions on past abuse, use of drugs and alcohol and if there are weapons in the household.

a photo of a Honda hybrid vehicle
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Ohioans looking to register their hybrid and electric vehicles will see higher fees at the BMV.

Hybrid owners will now pay $100 and electric vehicle owners will pay $200 to register with the state each year.

Registration for vehicles using only fossil fuels is about $35.

The new fees are part of the state transportation budget signed by Gov. Mike DeWine last April.

photo of Akron Police Vehicle
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The City of Akron has decided not to appeal a decision to reinstate fired Akron Police detective James Anthony. 

Anthony, a 23-year veteran of the Akron Police, is set to be reinstated to his former rank on January 6 according to a statement released by the city.

He was fired in February for a personal Facebook post following the Pittsburgh synagogue attack that left 11 people dead.  

In the post, he questioned why "no one has offed” Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who is known for his anti-Semitic statements.

BILLY LIAR / CC

There is an idea, that there are five Ohios. They are not only segmented by region, but so much more. Industrial and agricultural. Urban, suburban and rural. Upper and lower income. Black and white. Looking at them together, they might just provide a better understanding for our country as a whole.

a photo of a Naloxbox narcan kit
AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT

Religious leaders in Stark County are taking new steps in an effort to reduce opioid overdoses.

Participating houses of worship will help distribute naloxone to anyone who needs it.

Naloxone is already available county wide. But some people are not comfortable going into health centers to get the lifesaving drug.

Rev. Walter Moss is president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Association of Stark County and vicinity. He said providing naloxone is about helping the community.

an image of North St. in Akron
GOOGLE EARTH

Akron City Council is reviewing a proposal for a digital billboard that would stand just over 200 feet tall off of Route 8 on North Street. The billboard would be well over the city’s zoning code of a 50 foot limit. Some residents said the billboard would block views of the Cuyahoga River, calling it a "big stick of litter." City councilwoman Tara Mosley-Samples said that isn’t the issue.

"So, it’s really just about zoning and nothing else. I know they brought up aesthetics a couple times, but that has nothing to do with the zoning portion that the city is in control over."

A banner reading "GM INVEST IN LORDSTOWN" hangs on the fence along the truck gate to the shuttered GM Lordstown Assembly Facility.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

General Motors has announced it will create a new manufacturing plant in Lordstown to build high-performing batteries for electric vehicles. The new project is expected to bring more than 1,000 new jobs to the Mahoning Valley.

CITY OF AKRON

Akron City Councilman Russ Neal is the new President-Elect of the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials.

Neal, who represents Ward 4 on the west side of Akron, sees this as an opportunity for cities to come together and share their ‘best practices’ with each other.

He hopes his new position will help share the concerns of Akron with a wider audience and work collaboratively to find solutions to those issues.

a photo of Sherrod Brown
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Proposed legislation aims to better protect workers from abrupt notice of layoffs and work place closures.

The “Fair Warning Act of 2019” in conjunction with the already established WARN Act, would require employers to give earlier and wider notices of impending layoffs and closures. A move lawmakers think will help better prepare workers for their job loss.

Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), one of three senators introducing the legislation, says this act is about helping workers.

Attorneys Duriya Dhinojwala and Michael Steel co-founded the pro bono committee at Akron-based Brennan, Manna & Diamond. They participated in the free legal clinic offered by Community Legal Aid.
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Community Legal Aid is honoring two Akron attorneys for their pro bono work in Summit County.

A photo of the Greater Cleveland Food Bank logo.
Greater Cleveland Food Bank

The Greater Cleveland Food Bank has been chosen for a pilot program that seeks to help those in need in a new way.

A photo of voter machines.
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

In addition to a host of local races, tax levies and ballot questions in this year's election, voters in two counties in Northeast Ohio will be asked to make changes in how county government operates. 

Summit and Cuyahoga Counties are the only two counties in Ohio to have a charter form of government. In order to make changes in their organization, voters must approve the changes.

A Metro RTA bus
RAYMOND WAMBSGANS / CREATIVE COMMONS

Akron Metro RTA plans to use $3 million in grant funding from the State of Ohio for bus maintenance and bus stop improvements.

The money will also help Metro RTA fund new programs, including Flex Ride. The initiative aims to connect suburban job centers with workers in need of transportation. The program is expected to launch next year.

Metro RTA Planning Director Valarie Shay, says this money allows the organization the opportunity to do more with current budgets.

CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Workers at the General Motors Lordstown assembly plant have built cars and a community for more than 50 years. Earlier this year, GM shuttered the plant, but hope had remained that it would not close permanently. GM’s new contract with union workers, approved Friday, dashed those hopes. 

WKSU joined workers on the picket line at the assembly plant last week for a final farewell to Lordstown.

The sun begins to set in the early afternoon behind the General Motors Metal Fabrication Division in Parma, Ohio Tuesday, Sep. 17, 2019.
Carter Adams / WKSU

United Auto Workers members in Parma voted to ratify a new contract with General Motors today.

Nearly 90% of the plant’s 950 workers voted. 52 percent approved the deal while 48 percent did not. 

UAW Local 1005 President Mike Caldwell says this narrow decision has to do with how the contract affects each worker. 

UAW workers in Parma begin voting Wednesday on whether to ratify a proposed agreement or stay on strike and negotiate another contract.

Union officials and GM reached a tentative agreement late last week. It met some union demands, including maintaining healthcare benefits and providing a path for temporary workers to be hired full time.

However, some workers think the contract needs to do more for them and future workers. That includes Mike Crose, a 35-year GM employee.

Nick, a former GM employee, stands with fellow strikers in front of the main truck gate at the Lordstown GM assembly plant, Lordstown, Ohio. Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

The contract agreement reached between the UAW and General Motors that may end the month-long strike does not include a new product for the shuttered Lordstown plant in Trumbull County.

The deal meets many demands that sent 49,000 workers to the picket line. Those include a better healthcare plan, gradual wage increases and a path for temporary workers to be hired on full time. 

However the agreement maintains the closure of three of four facilities GM shut down earlier this year, including the assembly facility in Lordstown where the Chevy Cruze was made. 

City of Canton
JIMMY EMERSON / CREATIVE COMMONS

The city of Canton is expanding a program to attract new residents.

Since the mid-1990s the city has had four Community Reinvestment Areas. Now the whole city is part of the program. It allows property owners in the city to apply for a 15-year, 100% tax abatement.

To qualify, property owners must invest either $5,000 in existing property or build a new home.  

Christopher Hardesty, who runs the program, is hopeful it will revitalize the city.

Portage Path walkers
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron is celebrating its second annual “North American First People’s Day” with a series of events Friday through Monday. 

The weekend long celebration started in 2018 with a resolution by the Akron City Council declaring the first Monday in October as a day to honor and celebrate indigenous history and culture.

The celebration includes a walk on Sunday led by representatives from the Northern Cheyenne Nation along the historic Portage Path.

kayakers in the Cuyahoga River
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Cuyahoga River is now officially the 13th water trail in the state of Ohio. The designation was celebrated with a ribbon cutting at Water Works Park in Cuyahoga Falls.

Some of the participants in the designation ceremony paddled to the site at the Peninsula shelter next to the river.

Fifty years after it last burned the crooked river’s transformation from ecological disaster zone to water trail will lead to better management and a better user experience, according to Andrea Irland. She is an outdoor recreation planner for the National Park Service. 

The "corckscrew" rollercoaster at Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio.
DAVE A. / Creative Commons

Theme park operator Six Flags has approached Cedar Fair, owner of the Cedar Point amusement park, with a potential merger, according to a story released by Reuters.

Dennis Speigel, president of the consulting firm International Theme Park Services, says a merger would be momentous.

The track where an assault took place in the late hours of the morning. Kent State University, Kent, Ohio. Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

The identity of the man arrested in connection with an assault on Kent State’s campus has been released. KSU police arrested 21-year-old Christopher Eugene Clark near Summit Street and Loop Road.

Clark, of Newton Falls, is facing charges of gross sexual imposition, assault and obstructing official business.

A member of United Auto Workers Local 1005 stands on the picket line outside of the General Motors Metal Fabrication Division in Parma, Ohio Tuesday, Sep. 17, 2019.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

More than 900 General Motors workers in Parma are among the 50,000 UAW members currently on strike across the country. 

a photo of a referee at a basketball game
DAVEYNIN / FLICKR/CC

In an article published this week the Ohio High School Athletic Association issued a stern warning to parents and fans, saying their bad behavior is pushing referees off the field. If they don’t have game officials, OHSAA warns, there will be no more games.

A national report finds 80% of game officials quit after their first two years mainly because of unruly parents and fans.

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