Ann Thompson

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from India, Japan, South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ohio continues to give the green light to businesses that want to help pioneer the development of self-driving vehicles. Just last week at a COSI conference, Lt. Governor Jon Husted was wooing Toyota, Waymo, Ford, the American Trucking Associations, AAA and others.

At least four Southwest Ohio schools are participating in a program which uses a smart thermometer and an app to track and stop the spread of disease.

A handful of world-class tennis players who competed in the Western & Southern Open last week made an extra stop at a nearby cryotherapy spa, Arctic Blast Cryo. Some swear by the shocking cold temperatures, ranging from -190 °F to -270 °F, as a way to repair damage down to the cellular level.

Professional and collegiate sports teams have begun to experiment with cryptocurrency. Some have tried it and backed away, while others have strict limits. Some even allow ticket purchases with it.

A University of Cincinnati space professor who studies everything from Mars to maps is taking a deeper look into why so many people are coming to the U.S. Twenty-five years of satellite maps show deforestation and subsequent climate change are driving migrants to leave Central America.

How would you feel about a robot interviewing you for a job? Swedish company Tengai is working on an English version of its robot which it claims will ask you questions without biases. Other companies, like HireVue and Humantic, formerly DeepSense, dig for personality traits based on digital interviews and social media accounts.

Blue Water Vaccines, based in Norwood, has scheduled clinical trials for 2020 involving a universal flu vaccine it's developing. Tuesday the company closed on $7 million worth of funding led by CincyTech.

A Swedish company is marketing a stationary bike designed to help seniors reminisce in a safe and secure environment. Residents of The Kenwood by Senior Star retirement community are lining up to use it.

Steve Burns is a man of big ideas. In December 2017 he proudly showed off Workhorse's electric pick-up truck to WVXU, was perfecting drone delivery off the company's electric delivery trucks and touted his personal flying machine. Now he is planning to buy the GM Lordstown plant.

With a new state-of-the-art detect and avoid system, the Federal Aviation Administration has given the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) permission to fly its unmanned aerial systems (UAS) beyond visual line of sight at the Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport. This permission is called a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA). Ohio hopes to get its own permission but until then may partner with AFRL.

Updated: Friday, 4:28 p.m.

An Ohio man is in federal custody after falsely claiming he was a boy missing since 2011. 23-year-old Brian Rini is charged with lying to a federal agent. District Attorney Ben Glassman says DNA testing shows Rini is not Timmothy Pitzen of Illinois who was last seen in 2011.

Amazon has announced it will open a new air gateway at Wilmington Air Park in Wilmington, Ohio. The announcement comes as the company continues to build out its air hub operation at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

Power companies, including Duke Energy, are putting their drones into action to survey damage from Hurricane Florence. The information they get helps develop a plan to get the electricity back on sooner.

The family of terminal cancer patient Brody Allen say they have found a whole new family thanks to the generosity and love of the Tri-State. Sunday afternoon, more than 1,000 people traveled to Colerain Township to either be in or watch the Christmas-themed parade held in the 2-year-old's honor.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center scientists, in the process of creating a human gastrointestinal system in a lab, have grown an esophagus.

Updated: 6:25 p.m.  

Cincinnati Police responded to a call of an active shooter at the Fifth Third Bank building on Fountain Square early Thursday morning. The shooter is dead along with three of his victims. Two others were hospitalized. 

Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Wexner Medical Center have discovered high levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with high blood pressure, more than double the chances of a person getting type 2 diabetes. For African-Americans, the risk is almost three-fold. Chinese-Americans are 10 times more likely to develop diabetes.

photo of Nepali immigrants
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio immigrants are struggling in three key areas, according to a new report. 

Immigration attorney Allison Herre contributed to the "Our Pathway to a Brighter Future" report, which recommends greater access to educational opportunities, affordable legal services and better access to healthcare.

U.S. House of Representatives

Cincinnati-area congressman Brad Wenstrup was the first doctor on the scene this Wednesday morning to treat House Majority Whip Steve Scalise.  Scalise and four others were wounded after a gunman opened fire during baseball practice including Republican congressmen and staffers. Wenstrup is a former army surgeon.

After the gunman was shot by Capitol Hill police, Wenstrup ran out to the field to treat Scalise. He says the experience reminded him of his days as a combat surgeon in Iraq.

photo of UBER's OTTO autonomous truck
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Ohio is continuing to try to position itself as the epicenter of the self-driving industry. The Ohio Department of Transportation's Matt Bruning says the state has two smart corridors with two more in the works. He says technology companies like Ohio's variable climate and scenery.

"Alarming" is how Miami University officials describe the hospitalization of 21 students this weekend for alcohol abuse.

The ambulance runs started when a self-imposed moratorium by sororities and fraternities on alcohol events expired Thursday following  "rush," or the recruitment of new pledges.

University spokeswoman Claire Wagner says President Gregory Crawford had about 50-55 sorority and fraternity presidents at his home Friday to talk about the problem. He has also asked student leaders, faculty and staff for input about what else to do.