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CVS pharmacies to begin carrying drug to reverse the effects of opioids
Top headlines: Plan for Cleveland police reform to be submitted to federal judge for review; Gov. Kasich continues to focus attention on New Hampshire; Ohio begins mailing absentee ballots to military and overseas voters for March primary
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ
and MICHAEL BRATTON


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
Morning headlines for Monday, February 1, 2016:

  • CVS pharmacies to begin carrying drug that combats the effects of opioids
  • Plan for Cleveland police reform to be submitted to federal judge for review
  • Gov. John Kasich continues to focus attention on New Hampshire in presidential race
  • Ohio begins mailing absentee ballots to military and overseas voters for March primary
  • Kasich enters 2016 presidential campaign season with $2.5 million 
  • Prosecutors to announce new details in the fatal shooting of a Knox County police officer
  • Columbus sees little improvement in the recruitment of minorities, women for firefighter and police positions
  • Southwest Ohio water treatment plants to appeal order to reduce phosphorus discharge
  • Ohio CVS pharmacies to begin carrying drug that combats the effects of opioids
    A drug store chain is set to announce that it will make an antidote for heroin overdoses available at its Ohio stores. The Toledo Blade reports that CVS pharmacy officials, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and the White House national drug policy director will discuss today during a community forum at the University of Toledo how CVS stores will begin carrying naloxone, also known as Narcan. The drug is administered as an inhaler or with an injection and can reverse the breath suppression effects of opioids.

    Plan for Cleveland police reform to be submitted to federal judge for review
    Cleveland will be required to devise a new use-of-force policy for its police department and have officers trained to implement it by the end of the year. The requirement is included in the first-year plan for a consent decree. It will be submitted today to a federal judge by the independent monitoring team responsible for overseeing Cleveland's reform efforts. The city and U.S. Justice Department reached an agreement last year on a consent decree after a DOJ investigation concluded that Cleveland police officers had shown a pattern of using excessive force and violating people's civil rights. The first-year plan also calls for Cleveland to create a policing model that emphasizes closer ties with the community and a policy on how officers are supposed to do their jobs free of prejudice.

    Gov. John Kasich continues to focus attention on New Hampshire in presidential race
    While his GOP rivals are in Iowa for the presidential caucuses, Gov. John Kasich continues to focus on next week's primary in New Hampshire. Kasich yesterday visited a New Hampshire Elks lodge, saying that if elected president he'd push Congress to freeze every federal regulation not dealing with health or safety for a year. Meanwhile, leaders of a super PAC backing Kasich are accusing another group backing Marco Rubio of playing a role in an attack ad by a group that doesn't have to reveal its donors. The American Future Fund recently spent more than $1 million on an ad calling Kasich an "Obama Republican." Rubio backers deny involvement.

    Kasich enters 2016 presidential campaign season with $2.5 million
    Latest campaign finance reports show Ohio Gov. Kasich is near the bottom of the Republican presidential field with money to spend heading into next week’s New Hampshire primary. Kasich entered 2016 with about $2.5 million in the bank. Many New Hampshire polls have him in second or tied for third heading into the Granite State’s primary, though he lags his closest competitor, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, in fundraising. Rubio came into January with more than $10 million. However, Politico reports the pro-Kasich Super PAC New Day for America raised $4 million after the December 31 filing deadline. Kasich plans to stay in New Hampshire to campaign today while most presidential candidates will be in Iowa.

    Ohio begins mailing absentee ballots to military and overseas voters for March primary
    Elections officials are starting to send Ohio military and overseas voters their absentee ballots for the swing state's March 15 presidential primary. Early voting for other Ohioans begins on Feb. 17, which is the day after residents must register to vote for the primary election. Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted's office says it began sending ballots to military and overseas voters on Saturday. Military voters who have not yet registered to vote or requested an absentee ballot can still do so by visiting OhioMilitaryVotes.com. Overseas voters can visit OhioVoterPassport.com. Each can track the status of their mailed ballot and sign up for election reminders. 

    Prosecutors to announce new details in the fatal shooting of a Knox County police officer
    Prosecutors say they plan to discuss developments in the case of an Ohio village police officer gunned down earlier this month. The Knox County Prosecutor's Office is planning a news conference today in Mount Vernon, about 50 miles northeast of Columbus, to talk about the incident. Thirty-four-year-old Officer Thomas Cottrell's body was found behind the village municipal building in Danville late on Jan. 17. He'd been shot in the head. A suspect, 32-year-old Herschel Ray Jones, is expected to be charged.

    Columbus sees little improvement in the recruitment of minorities, women for firefighter and police positions
    A newspaper reports that Ohio's largest city has seen little improvement in its recruitment of minorities and women as firefighters and police officers. The Dispatch reports that Columbus has spent $150,000 in the last few years on minority recruiting. But there were only three blacks and one woman in a class of 41 recruits who graduated from the city's fire academy on Friday. Minorities make up more than 40 percent of Columbus' population. Columbus has hired an attorney who is a former manager of corporate affairs at Honda to help diversify the city's workforce.

    Southwest Ohio water treatment plants to appeal order to reduce phosphorus discharge
    Two wastewater treatment plants in southwest Ohio are appealing the state's order to reduce the amount of phosphorus that goes into the Great Miami River. Dayton and Montgomery County say changing their operations to comply with the new rules could cost up to $2 million. They say those costs would need to be passed onto water customers. The Ohio EPA earlier rejected a request to delay setting the limits. The state EPA says its research shows the plants are sending too much phosphorus into the river during the summer and that can add up to more toxic algae blooms.

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