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Ohio health officials are on alert for signs of Zika
Travelers to South America, the Caribbean and Central America are being warned of the rapid spread of Zika virus
by WKSU's STATEHOUSE CORRESPONDENT JO INGLES


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Jo Ingles
 
The Yellow Fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the main carrier of the Zika virus. It lives in parts of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California, but so far those populations have not been exposed to the virus.
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The state Department of Health has been answering questions from the public about a virus that poses a danger to pregnant women.

Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

LISTEN: Zika isn't near Ohio, yet

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Outbreaks of the Zika virus have occurred in Africa, Southeast Asia, South America, Central American and the Caribbean but not in Ohio -- yet.  

Health experts say there have been a few cases in other states with people who have traveled to areas where there are outbreaks.

The virus, which is spread through mosquito bites, causes only one in five people who contract it to get sick, but it’s particularly dangerous for pregnant women because it is thought to cause serious birth defects.  

The Ohio Department of Health says there’s limited reason to worry about the virus here right now. 

But it does note that the Centers for Disease Control recommends pregnant women consider postponing travel to any area where the virus transmission in ongoing.

 
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