News
News Home
Quick Bites Archive
Exploradio Archive
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Science and Technology


Sunday's rare lunar eclipse phenomenon won't be seen again until 2033
The lunar eclipse is also a supermoon and a tetrad, or blood moon
by WKSU's LAUREN BLUE


Reporter
Lauren Blue
 
The eclipse will start at 9:07 PM and be at its deepest in the eclipse at 10:48 PM Sunday. It will be visible until 12:27 AM.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Download (WKSU Only)

Make sure to look up on Sunday night because it will be the last time until 2033 to see a total lunar eclipse that is also a super moon and a tetrad, or blood moon.

This rare event occurs when the moon is closest to the Earth, making it look up to 14 percent larger, while traveling through Earth’s shadow. This is the fourth phase in a succession of lunar eclipses, making it a tetrad.

Jason Davis is an astronomer at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. He says the blood red color is the result of the scattering of refracted light on the surface of the moon.

LISTEN: Sunday's rare lunar eclipse phenomenon won't be seen again until 2033

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:18)


“You can think of the moon’s reddish-brown color during the eclipse as a projection of all of the sunsets and sunrises on the Earth at that moment," says Davis.  

He says, "a neat way to think about it would be if you were standing on the moon looking back at Earth you would see this just brilliant ring of red light.” 

Davis says different things can affect the color. Volcanic eruptions and a particularly cloudy day will make the moon look redder.

The eclipse will start at 9:07 PM and be at its deepest in the eclipse at 10:48 PM Sunday. 

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page




Stories with Recent Comments

Copyright © 2020 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University