News

photo of opioids
SHUTTERSTOCK

Summit County will receive 38% percent of the cash settlement pharmaceutical companies reached with Summit and Cuyahoga Counties. The percentage is based on population. The bulk of the money will come from a deal with AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson Corp. Generic drugmaker Teva Pharmaceutical has agreed to pay $20 million and provide $25 million dollars worth of products to the two counties.  

County executive Ilene Shapiro is creating an advisory task force to determine how that money will be spent.

photo of Ellet High School
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

This fall the Akron Public Schools opened a brand new high school for the Ellet community. Its 69-year old predecessor is set to be torn down. The district gave alums a chance to say a final goodbye to the old building over the weekend. We share a collection of their memories. 

a photo of the petition
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The hotly-contested energy law that bails out nuclear power plants takes effect Tuesday. A group trying to pause the law and put it before voters did not turn in their signatures by the Monday deadline. But the anti-nuclear bailout group is taking a different route.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts says they didn't have enough signatures to qualify for a referendum by the deadline.  

The group's Gene Pierce says their referendum drive has been met with heavy opposition, including ads, mailers, and canvassers who allegedly blocked and harassed signature collectors.

a photo of John Nicholas and Stan Smith
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Like death and taxes, being hit by a computer virus seems inevitable.

Cybercrime took a $100 billion bite out of the U.S. economy last year alone.

It’s not just individuals who are hacked. Cities, schools and small businesses are increasingly targeted.

In this week’s Exploradio, a look at local efforts to fight the onslaught by training the next generation of cyber warriors.

Kelly Kendrick is IT director at Coventry Local Schools, a small district south of Akron.

A photo of Matt Dolan
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The gun violence bill that Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled two months after the Dayton mass shooting will soon have its first hearing in the Ohio Senate. The bill has been criticized by some gun rights advocates for going too far and some gun control activists for not going far enough. Its sponsor is defending the plan, which does not include mandatory background checks but does offer a version of a red flag gun seizure law.

Photo of the Ohio Department of Transportation's Traffic Center
/ STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio has been at the forefront of engineering self-driving cars. The state transportation department wants to hear what citizens have to say about the future of Ohio roads and highways. It’s hosting a public meeting Monday in Akron to gather ideas for improving the state’s transportation system over the next 25 years. ODOT spokesman Matt Bruning said they will show their plans and listen to the community.

TEDEYTAN / CREATIVE COMMONS

 A new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation says 2 million Ohioans are at risk of losing their health insurance if the Trump administration’s lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act succeeds. People with pre-existing conditions are particularly vulnerable.

But Senator Sherrod Brown says that’s not all.  

   

photo of Chris Dameron in a truck
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After a six-month pilot period that ended in July, the state is restarting a shortened amnesty program for Ohioans who’ve lost their drivers’ licenses. Over 340,000 people could get back on the roads legally – sometimes after many years of not being able to pay reinstatement fees.

Chris Damron of Columbus lost his license for failing to pay child support when he was 19. Almost two decades later, he’s in recovery and owns a painting business and is a licensed driver again, after having $1,500 in reinstatement fees waived earlier this year.

photo of protesters
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An Ohio Senate committee is set to hear from opponents of a bill that would provide what’s being called “reversed abortions.”

Chemical abortions require two pills to be taken 72 hours apart. Barry Sheets with the Right to Life Action Coalition of Ohio said abortions can be reversed before that second pill is taken, especially when progesterone is prescribed within hours after taking the first pill.

photo of House Bill 6 petitioners
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Petitioners are giving one last push into the drive that would put Ohio's nuclear bailout law before voters. The referendum effort must file enough valid signatures by Monday afternoon in order to qualify for next year's ballot.

Opponents of the law said it's a corporate bailout for FirstEnergy Solutions. They're also against the coal subsidies and the cuts to green energy policies. That's why they want to put the law on the ballot for a potential repeal.

photo of volunteers at Park East
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A long-neglected park near downtown Akron has been refurbished and expanded as part of the ongoing Civic Commons project.

Nick, a former GM employee, stands with fellow strikers in front of the main truck gate at the Lordstown GM assembly plant, Lordstown, Ohio. Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

The contract agreement reached between the UAW and General Motors that may end the month-long strike does not include a new product for the shuttered Lordstown plant in Trumbull County.

The deal meets many demands that sent 49,000 workers to the picket line. Those include a better healthcare plan, gradual wage increases and a path for temporary workers to be hired on full time. 

However the agreement maintains the closure of three of four facilities GM shut down earlier this year, including the assembly facility in Lordstown where the Chevy Cruze was made. 

photo of Hall of Fame Village concept drawing
PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Oct. 18:

Mark Arehart / WKSU

For some people, when they think of wallpaper they may think of garish prints from the '60s and '70s. Or maybe even their childhood bedroom.

Two Akron wallpaper lovers got together to write a book about the Rubber City’s love affair with wallcoverings. On this week’s State of the Arts, we peel back the pages of the new book "If This Wallpaper Could Talk" by Karen Starr and Shane Wynn.

photo of graduation
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

More than half of Northeast Ohio graduates leave the area once they get their degrees. That’s according to research from Team NEO. But that number can be deceiving.

Fewer than 47 percent of graduates stay in the region. While that may seem like a low number, Team NEO’s research chief Jacob Duritsky says it’s comparable to other large metropolitan areas. The problem is in the actual population.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s attorney general said his office is disappointed in a reported settlement with five drug makers and distributors in advance of a huge opioid trial – a trial he tried to delay.

Drug manufacturers Teva and Johnson & Johnson and distributors McKesson, AmerisourceBergen and Ohio-based Cardinal Health are reportedly offering $22 billion in cash along with $28 billion in drugs and services. AG Dave Yost said it’s not enough.

a photo of Senator ROB PORTMAN
WKSU

A number of Republicans have questioned President Donald Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria. Sen. Rob Portman said the placement of troops in northern Syria has brought stability to the region. He said taking troops out was a mistake.

“We’ve seen chaos descend. Not just on the Kurds, but also on others who live in that area who are now refugees and then also giving the opportunity for other forces to come in.”

Sheri Baker (left) talks with fellow UAW member Isaac Valle (right)
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Union leaders are looking through a tentative agreement between labor and General Motors that could end a strike that's lasted longer than 30 days. Democratic state lawmakers say they want legislation that would not only help union workers in any future strikes, but could benefit the workers of the current strike too.

House Democrats want to change the law that says striking workers don't receive unemployment compensation and food stamp benefits because they're considered to be people who are voluntarily leaving their jobs. And they’d make that retroactive.

David Johnson, United Auto Workers Union member for 46 years, poses for a portrait with a UAW ON STRIKE picket sign outside of the General Motors Metal Fabrication Facility, where he has worked for the last six years. Parma, Ohio Tuesday, Sep. 17, 2019.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

United Auto Workers (UAW) at General Motors (GM) are expected to vote this weekend on a tentative deal negotiators have reached with the company. UAW workers who lost their jobs when GM Lordstown shut down in March had hoped the national agreement would include a future for their plant. Sen. Rob Portman said it’s disappointing that it doesn’t.

a drug disposal bags
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

When workers who have been injured on the job go to pharmacies to fill prescriptions for opioid painkillers, they will soon be getting something else with it.

Starting November 1, pharmacies statewide will give injured workers a drug disposal bag with their opioid prescriptions. Gov. Mike DeWine said these special bags have chemicals that break down unused drugs for disposal. 

“This effort will help insure that any extra prescriptions do not end up in the wrong hands," DeWine said. "They don’t end up in the hands of children or in some way be diverted.” 

a photo of Tim Ryan
FACEBOOK

When Democrats running for president debated Tuesday in suburban Columbus, the only one from Ohio was not on the stage.

Congressman Tim Ryan’s latest fundraising report, which was released on the same night, explains why.

The latest campaign finance reports came out the same day as the debate and Tim Ryan was at the bottom, raising just over $425,000 ($425,731) between July and September. That’s less than half of what he raised ($895,000) during the previous reporting period.

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Oct. 17:

THE SCENIC ROUTE

The Canton pop rock band The Scenic Route is a family business that’s picking up steam. The six-piece is fronted by 23-year-old founder, Rachel Crozier, and managed by her dad, Brad Crozier, who's been preparing his daughter for big stages for most of her life.

akron press club debate
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Supporting Akron’s downtown businesses during reconstruction, revitalizing neighborhoods and allocating settlement money from Summit County’s opioid lawsuit were among topics addressed during a mayoral debate Wednesday hosted by the Akron Press Club.

Incumbent Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan and Republican challenger Josh Sines faced off at Quaker Station.

The candidates were asked whether Akron’s already high water and sewer rates would increase over the next four years.

Mayor Dan Horrigan said they would not increase before 2021.

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