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00000174-c556-d691-a376-cdd69e980000Day after day, week after week, the headlines in Northeast Ohio and across much of the country contain news of tragic loss: lives lost to opioids. It’s a problem that knows no bounds: geography, race, gender, level of education or income.The problem took on new urgency this summer as the powerful elephant sedative, Carfentanil, began hitting the streets. First responders armed with their only weapon, the overdose antidote Naloxone, have struggled to keep up with what’s become an overwhelming problem. It’s an issue that’s straining public and social resources. What has become clear is that business as usual is not going to fix the problem.WKSU news has been covering the unfolding crisis. Tuesdays during Morning Edition, the WKSU news team digs even deeper. WKSU reporters will examine what’s led us here and what might be done to turn the tide. Support for Opioids: Turning the Tide in the Crisis comes from Wayne Savings Community Bank, Kent State University Office of Continuing and Distance Education, Hometown Grocery Delivery, Mercy Medical Center, AxessPointe Community Health Center, Community Support Services, Inc., Medina County District Library and Hudson Community First.00000174-c556-d691-a376-cdd69e980001

BioEnterprise Teams With Accenture to Find Private Sector Solutions to the Opioid Crisis

Photo of the Global Center
JEFF ST.CLAIR
/
WKSU public radio
The Global Center for Health Innovation will be hosting an ongoing examination of the role private sector companies can play in solving the opioid crisis. The initiative, led by BioEnterprise, includes local hospitals, start-ups, and tech companies with

Cleveland’s biomedical leaders are looking at how the private sector can help fight the opioid epidemic.

Local business development group BioEnterprise is teaming with the international consulting firm Accenture to help health care providers find ways to improve addiction treatment and prevention.

CEO Aram Nerpouni says while lawmakers and law enforcement have so far led the response to the opioid crisis, the private sector needs to assess its role.

He says the public sector is throwing money at the opioid crisis, but it's also worth asking, “Where are private investors investing money to address this challenge and where are private companies spending their time in terms of technology development, data collection, those kind of things, to address it.”

BioEnterprise has formed a working group of industry experts that will meet at the Global Center for Health Innovation in Cleveland to target areas for action.

The group is focusing on data analytics and technological solutions.

Nerpouni says the goal is to develop models that can be adapted to communities across the country.

Other participants in the initial briefing included: The offices of Senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, and Attorney General Mike Dewine; Ohio Development Services Agency; Ohio Third Frontier; The Northeast Ohio Hospital Opioid Consortium (Cleveland Clinic, MetroHealth, Northeast Ohio VA Healthcare System, St. Vincent’s Charity Medical Center and University Hospitals); Surescripts; Appriss Health; Groups Recover Together; Self Refind; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Health Velocity Capital; Cordata; Axial Healthcare; and The Dalton Foundation.