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Ohio Redistricting Commission prepares to meet in response to supreme court rejection

 The redistricting committee meets again to hear public input on maps.
Daniel Konik
/
Statehouse News Bureau
The Ohio Redistricting Commission previously meets to hear public input on maps. The Commission is scheduled to meet again over the weekend to respond to the Ohio Supreme Court's rejection of the three proposed maps.

The Ohio Redistricting Commission is planning to convene for a rare weekend meeting to take the first steps in response to the supreme court's latest ruling.

The third attempt at drawing House and Senate maps was invalidated by a 4-3 opinion from the court. Justices said the commission must draft a plan that does not unduly favor one party over another.

The process for the three previous maps included the Republican and Democratic legislative caucuses drafting their own maps then proposing them to the commission.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says he wants the commission to ask the Republican and Democratic mapmakers to work together on the next proposal.

"This is a specialized art, and trying to get this done in 10 days is important. We need to follow what the court has said, and we need to follow all the things the court has told us in three different opinions. But we also have to be able to match that and to do what the constitution requires us to do," DeWine said.

Sec. of State Frank LaRose (R-Ohio) sent a letter to DeWine and lawmakers Thursday evening to lay out the state of the May 3 primary. LaRose said it is not possible for state legislative races to appear on the May 3 primary ballot, barring further action from federal court.

Legislative leaders have been reviewing their options since the court announced its ruling.
Copyright 2022 The Statehouse News Bureau. To see more, visit The Statehouse News Bureau.

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.