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Government & Politics
2018 was a big election year in Ohio. Republicans held onto all five statewide executive offices including governor and super majorities in both the Ohio House and Senate. But there were a few bright spots for Democrats, among them the reelection of U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown and the election of two Democrats to the Ohio Supreme Court.With election 2018 over, the focus now shifts to governing. Stay connected with the latest on politics, policies and people making the decisions at all levels affecting your lives.

Ohio Governor Candidate Cordray Announces Workforce Development Plan That Focuses on Job Training

photo of Richard Cordray
DAN KONIK
/
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU
Democratic candidate for governor, Richard Cordray (right), says the widening skills gap is one of the biggest challenges to Ohio's workforce development.

Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Richard Cordray unveiled a workforce development and job creation plan, saying that workers must come first if the state wants to thrive economically. His proposal also includes focusing on small businesses and investment in training.

Cordray said one of the biggest challenges the state faces is a widening skills gap where there aren’t enough trained workers to fill job vacancies. 

So he wants to invest more federal funding into training. He added that the door could open wider for tens of thousands of state government jobs by basing hiring on more than just educational requirements.

“It should be about what skills do you bring to the table," he said. "Can you do the functions of the job and that’s how we should interview people and that’s how we should hire people. It’s not solely about paper credentials."

His Republican opponent Mike DeWine recently laid out his so-called “Prosperity Plan,” which included incentives for job creation and modernizing workforce development.

Cordray counters that DeWine has a record of focusing on big businesses rather than small companies and labor.