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2018 was a big election year in Ohio. Republicans held onto all five statewide executive offices including governor and super majorities in both the Ohio House and Senate. But there were a few bright spots for Democrats, among them the reelection of U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown and the election of two Democrats to the Ohio Supreme Court.With election 2018 over, the focus now shifts to governing. Stay connected with the latest on politics, policies and people making the decisions at all levels affecting your lives.

Deadline is Fast Approaching for Drug Addiction Treatment Ballot Measure

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The group is hoping to present 700,000 signatures, which would be more than double the required amount.

While many Ohioans are enjoying picnics, parades and fireworks, members of a group that wants to put a proposed ballot issue before voters this fall are working to meet the July 4th deadline.

A group that wants the state to spend more money on treatment for drug addiction instead of prison hopes to present more than 700,000 signatures from registered voters to the Secretary of State’s office to put the issue on the statewide ballot this fall – more than double the number they’d need to be valid to make that happen.

It's being called “The Neighborhood Safety, Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation” amendment. It's backed by the Ohio Safe and Healthy Communities campaign – a coalition of community, law enforcement, faith and business leaders from around the state.

In a written statement, the group says the large number of signatures gathered are “testament to the number of Ohioans who want our state to invest in proven treatment for addiction instead of more spending on bloated prisons.”

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.