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Corporation for Public Broadcasting FAQ

Corporation for Public Broadcasting

What is the Corporation for Public Broadcasting?

  • The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a private, nonprofit corporation and the largest single source of funding for public radio, television, and related online and mobile services.
  • CPB acts as the steward for the government’s investment in public broadcasting.
  • Each year, Congress appropriates funds to CPB, which CPB then distributes directly to stations as Community Service Grants (CSGs).

 Does WKSU get funds from CPB?

  • Last year, 11% of WKSU’s operating budget came from CPB and went towards programming costs. This reflects the national average for public radio stations.
  • CPB grants were instrumental in establishing WKSU’s infrastructure.
  • NPR also receives some funds (around 0.6% of its budget) for program development.
  • Most of WKSU’s budget, 75%, comes from listeners and community partners.

 How much money does each taxpayer pay for CPB funding?

  • Federal contribution to public broadcasting amounts to $1.35 per American per year.
  • For radio alone, this amounts to 30 cents.
  • The cost of public broadcasting is only 0.01% of the entire federal budget.

 CPB by the numbers

  • For every federal dollar invested through CPB, stations raise more than $6 on their own.
  • CPB funds 408 public radio grantees, representing 1,136 stations.
  • An average 95% of the annual federal CPB appropriation goes to public broadcasting stations and the public broadcasting system.

 Should we call our Congressman or Senator about threats to CPB?

  • You are always free to call your national representatives and say that you support CPB, public broadcasting and WKSU.
  • As government budgets are established, a cut to CPB has often been discussed (the first time was in 1969, the year PBS was established).
  • Any annually budget goes through a long process through committee and it is anticipated that there will be changes before it is voted on by Congress.

 Corporation for Public Broadcasting History

  • Lyndon Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act into law on Nov. 7, 1967, establishing the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) to administer funding to TV and radio stations.
  • CPB celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.
  • NPR was incorporated with help from CPB in 1970.

 Good websites to know