© 2022 WKSU
Public Radio News for Northeast Ohio
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Morning Headlines: Severe respiratory viruses send more kids to ER ... and more

Nebulizer
Victor Mulero
/
Shutterstock
Viruses that are similar to a cold but with more severe symptoms are circulating and causing an uptick in children visiting the ER, University Hospital officials said.

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Sept. 21:

  • Severe respiratory viruses send more Northeast Ohio kids to ER
  • The future of St. Vincent Charity Hospital's psych ER is in doubt
  • Weingart, Ronayne work to draw distinctions in Cuyahoga County executive debate
  • Ohio school board to vote in October on LGBTQ protections for students
  • US House of Representatives approves bill to make Holocaust Monument a national landmark
  • State provides online quiz to help gauge risk level for gambling disorder
  • Youngstown State University faculty union denounces possible cuts
  • 'SwimShady' and two other manatees preparing to leave the Cincinnati Zoo for Florida
  • Straw leads Guardians to 10-7 win over White Sox
  • Your weather forecast: A broken line of thunderstorms

Severe respiratory viruses send more Northeast Ohio kids to ER
More children are being sent to Northeast Ohio emergency rooms with severe respiratory illnesses caused by a resurgence in two viruses, University Hospitals' (UH) pediatric doctors say. The increase is being fueled by rhinoviruses (RV) and enteroviruses (EV), which commonly peak in late summer and fall, said Dr. Claudia Hoyen, pediatric infectious disease specialist at UH. The viruses are similar to a cold but can cause much more severe symptoms, such as shortness of breath, heavy wheezing and, in rare cases, weakness in limbs, she said. This year has seen a particularly sharp increase in ER visits. [Ideastream Public Media]

The future of St. Vincent Charity Hospital's psych ER is in doubt
The future of Cleveland’s only psychiatric emergency room is uncertain after St. Vincent Charity Medical Center announced last week it would close its medical ER and inpatient services on Nov. 15. Key to the decision will be whether the Alcohol Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board of Cuyahoga County will provide nearly $3.8 million in funding to the Sisters of Charity Health System to help fund the operation. The hospital, in Cleveland’s Central neighborhood, is the primary emergency department for people during a psychiatric emergency, when they may be homicidal or suicidal. St. Vincent is home to one of only two psychiatry ERs in the state. [Ideastream Public Media]

Weingart, Ronayne work to draw distinctions in Cuyahoga County executive debate
The two candidates for Cuyahoga County executive tried to contrast each other’s visions for county government at Tuesday’s City Club of Cleveland debate, but they largely avoided sparring during the hourlong exchange. Democratic candidate Chris Ronayne and Republican hopeful Lee Weingart met at the Renaissance Cleveland Hotel at noon, answering questions from county residents in a conversation moderated by Ideastream Public Media. In one of the debate’s only contentious moments, Weingart tied Ronayne to the outgoing administration of Democratic County Executive Armond Budish, accusing his opponent of lacking a plan to attract employers to town. Shortly after Weingart’s remark, Ronayne pitched himself as a county executive who could make use of longstanding relationships with the region’s civic leaders. [Ideastream Public Media]

Ohio school board to vote in October on LGBTQ protections for students
Ohio's State Board of Education won't vote until at least October on a resolution opposing changes to Title IX that would add federal protections for LGBTQ students. The four-page resolution, introduced by Board Member Brendan Shea, says the Biden administration's plan to expand Title IX's discrimination definition to include gender identity and sexual orientation could destroy "foundational truths upon which education rests." [The Columbus Dispatch]

US House of Representatives approves bill to make Holocaust Monument a national landmark
A bill to make a Northeast Ohio monument to Holocaust victims a national landmark is now headed to the U.S. Senate, after the House passed the measure in a voice vote earlier this week. The Kol Israel Holocaust Monument in Bedford Heights was one of America’s first Holocaust memorials. The legislation was sponsored by Rep. Shontel Brown (OH-11). Sen. Sherrod Brown is sponsoring a companion bill in the Senate. [WKYC]

State provides online quiz to help gauge risk level for gambling disorder
The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services is calling on people to “Get Set Before You Bet” as part of Responsible Gambling Education Month. Scott Anderson, problem gambling specialist with the department, said gambling disorder is a unique addiction because it has the ability to offer some type of hope to benefit in some way — although the benefits are fleeting and the odds are stacked against the gambler. He said it’s appropriate the month coincides with National Suicide Prevention month. “The important thing to do is just check on one another. If you haven't seen somebody in a while, knock on the door. Ask how they are. Ask if they're okay,” said Anderson. [Statehouse News Bureau]

Youngstown State University faculty union denounces possible cuts 
The union representing faculty at Youngstown State University on Tuesday criticized possible cuts to programs and faculty in up to 11 departments. “It’s impossible to overstate how much chaos this creates for our students,” YSU-OEA President Mark Vopat said in a news release. “Our courses and programs should be our top priority as a university. Instead, YSU’s administration is taking a hatchet to education while refusing to address administrative bloat and overspending on athletics.” Provost Brien Smith announced the possible cuts Monday in a letter to faculty. [Mahoning Matters]

'SwimShady' and two other manatees preparing to leave the Cincinnati Zoo for Florida
Three manatees in the Cincinnati Zoo's rehabilitation program are almost ready to head back to their native waters in Florida. "SwimShady," "Alby" and "Manhattan" are scheduled to leave in early October. The trio garnered media attention when zoo staffers named one SwimShady — a play on rapper Eminem’s “The Real Slim Shady” — a good fit for another Manatee Springs resident, a gar named "Snoop Logg." They'll go first to a care facility to get reacclimated before being released into the wild. [WVXU]

Straw leads Guardians to 10-7 win over White Sox
Myles Straw hit a tie-breaking two-run double in the 11th inning to help push the Cleveland Guardians past the Chicago White Sox, 10-7, and closer to the American League Central title. Steven Kwan followed with his fourth hit, an RBI single, to score Straw. The Guardians expanded their lead to five games over the White Sox with 14 games remaining. [AP]

Your weather forecast: A broken line of thunderstorms is expected to develop this afternoon through tonight
Some of these storms could become severe, with damaging winds, large hail and even the possibility of an isolated tornado. High 89. Tonight, showers and thunderstorms, mainly before midnight. Wind gusts up to 25 miles per hour. Low 57. Thursday, cloudy, a 30% chance of rain, cooler. High 63. [National Weather Service]

Amy Eddings is Host/Producer of NPR’s “Morning Edition” on Ideastream Public Media.
Jay Shah is a broadcast journalist finishing her Master of Arts degree at Kent State University. She joined WKSU as a news intern in 2020 and now works as a freelance producer for Ideastream Public Media’s daily local news headlines.