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Morning Headlines: First Summit monkeypox case is resident who traveled out of state ... and more

An image from an electron microscope of the monkeypox virus (orange) on infected cells (green).
NIAID
An image from an electron microscope of the monkeypox virus (orange) on infected cells (green).

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Aug. 12:

  • Summit County’s first monkeypox case is a resident who traveled out of state
  • Suspect dead following incident at Cincinnati FBI office and police standoff
  • Ohio elections officials being hit with requests for records from the 2020 vote
  • Iconic Goodrich smokestacks will remain as part of remediation, reuse of site
  • Two Northeast Ohio metro areas named best places to be a teacher in US
  • Cedar Point's heyday reimagined at The Boardwalk
  • Weather: Sunny and clear, high 78

Summit County’s first monkeypox case is a resident who traveled out of state
The patient was exposed while traveling and has not had direct contact with other Summit County residents, Summit County Public Health said in a media release. The individual will continue to isolate out-of-state. Health officials believe the risk to other people in Summit County is low. [Ideastream Public Media]

Suspect dead following incident at Cincinnati FBI office and police standoff
An armed individual wearing body armor attempted to get inside the Cincinnati FBI office Thursday, prompting a police chase that led officers to a standoff with the suspect in Clinton County. The Ohio State Highway Patrol says the suspect was shot and killed by law enforcement around 3:42 p.m. Officers attempted to negotiate with the suspect, according to Lt. Nathan Dennis. After some time, they moved forward to attempt to take the suspect into custody using "less-than-lethal" munition rounds. The suspect reportedly raised a firearm toward the officers, who then shot and killed him. [WVXU]

Ohio elections officials being hit with requests for records from the 2020 vote
Despite no evidence of problems with the November 2020 vote in Ohio, dozens of sizable requests for voting records from that election are coming in to county elections officials as they’re finishing up work on a second statewide primary and gearing up for this fall’s election. Delivering on those could mean more work and costs for those boards as well as obstacles for workers who are already dealing with a challenging election year. Ohio Association of Elections Officials president Brian Sleeth directs the Warren County Board of Elections. In an interview for "The State of Ohio," he said seven requests have come in for basically anything related to the 2020 vote, including copies of all ballots. [The Statehouse News Bureau]

Iconic Goodrich smokestacks will remain as part of remediation, reuse of site
Akron will use funds from Ohio’s Brownfield Remediation Program to clean up portions of the former B.F. Goodrich power plant downtown. Brad Beckert with the city’s Office of Integrated Development says money will be used to remove asbestos and tear down parts of one building near the smokestacks which are unsafe. Beckert says the smokestacks are stable for now but will probably have to come down eventually. Akron says that there are no immediate plans for the site but that there is interest from developers. This is among 11 projects in Summit County getting funding from the brownfield program. [Akron Beacon Journal]

Two Northeast Ohio metro areas named best places to be a teacher in US
The teaching profession has had its fair share of turmoil over the last few years with many teachers leaving classrooms due to low wages, wages not keeping up with inflation, long hours and dissatisfaction. The website SmartAsset analyzed data on the 137 largest metro areas throughout the country to come up with a list of the best and worst places to be a teacher in 2022. They compared areas such as employment, income, housing costs, classroom size, school funding and access to the internet. Youngstown and Canton ranked in the top ten. [WKYC-TV]

Cedar Point's heyday reimagined at The Boardwalk
Cedar Point is reaching back into its history for some new attractions for the 2023 season. Planned for next year is The Boardwalk, an area of the park hearkening back to its earlier days, when it was known as the "Queen of American Watering Places." The Boardwalk will include a new Wild Mouse roller coaster. The Wild Mouse will be Cedar Point's 18th roller coaster and will be reminiscent of one that the park had in the 1960’s. Plans are also being made for a Grand Pavilion, commemorating the park's original pavilion, which debuted in 1888. The new Grand Pavilion will have two levels, featuring a restaurant, bar with a view of Lake Erie and other panoramic vistas. [The Medina Gazette]

Weather: Sunny and clear, high 78
Sunny and mostly clear until tonight with a high near 78, low 54. A high of 80 tomorrow and chance of showers at night until Sunday. A chance of showers and thunderstorms on Sunday night with a low nearing 61. [National Weather Service]

Amy Eddings is Host/Producer of NPR’s “Morning Edition” on Ideastream Public Media.
Jay Shah is a broadcast journalist finishing her Master of Arts degree at Kent State University. She joined WKSU as a news intern in 2020 and now works as a freelance producer for Ideastream Public Media’s daily local news headlines.