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Morning Headlines: Cleveland could require police body cam footage within 7 days...and more

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Cleveland City Council will soon require police bodycam footage to be released within seven days showing up to 60 seconds prior to any incident involving deadly force.

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 4:

  • Cleveland City Council may require release of police bodycam footage within seven days
  • NFL appeal may mean a longer suspension for Browns QB Deshaun Watson
  • Tamara McLoyd found guilty on murder charges in killing of Cleveland police officer
  • Ohio Department of Health awards $7 million to 26 community organizations
  • Cuyahoga County weighs $50 million expansion to Global Center for Health Innovation
  • The Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement is this weekend

Cleveland City Council may require release of police body cam footage within 7 days
(Ideastream Public Media) — On Wednesday, Cleveland City Council’s safety committee moved ahead with an ordinance that would require the city to release video footage of police officers using deadly force within seven days of the incident. The proposal resembles an Akron charter amendment approved by voters last year. Cleveland has had body cameras since 2015, and officers are required to turn them on during any call for service.

NFL appeal may mean a longer suspension for Browns QB Deshaun Watson
(Associated Press) — The NFL is appealing a disciplinary officer's decision to suspend Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson for six games for violating the league's personal conduct policy. The league is giving Commissioner Roger Goodell or someone he designates authority to impose a stiffer penalty. The players' union has until the end of business Friday to respond in writing.

Tamara McLoyd found guilty on murder charges in killing of Cleveland police officer
(WKYC) — On Wednesday, a jury determined that 19-year-old Tamara McLoyd was guilty of multiple murder charges relating to the killing of an off-duty police officer Shane Bartek on New Year's Eve. McLoyd was found guilty of aggravated murder, murder, felonious assault, aggravated robbery, grand theft, having weapons under disability and theft. Sentencing has been set for Sept. 27.

Ohio Department of Health awards $7 million to 26 community organizations
(Cleveland.com) — The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) has awarded $6.89 million to 26 community-based organizations with the goal of supporting projects that improve the health and lives of residents in areas designated Ohio Health Improvement Zones. Those zones are neighborhoods ODH has identified as dealing with socioeconomic and demographic factors that affect the resilience of individuals and communities. Northeast Ohio organizations such as the Summit County Combined General Health District and Cuyahoga County Board of Health were awarded grants.

Cuyahoga County weighs $50 million expansion to Global Center for Health Innovation
(Ideastream Public Media) — Destination Cleveland CEO David Gilbert told a Cuyahoga County Council committee Tuesday that a suite of renovations would make the building more appealing to conference planners. The expansion will add more staircases and escalators to the building’s main atrium, and the center’s ballroom would nearly double in size from 11,000 square feet to about 20,000.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement is this weekend
(Ideastream Public Media) — The Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton this weekend will enshrine the Class of 2022, a group of players and executives with a combined nine Super Bowl rings and 25 Pro Bowls. This year's class includes several players who have been eligible for decades, such as wide receiver Cliff Branch and linebacker Sam Mills – both elected posthumously. The youngest player this year is tackle Richard Seymour, who won three Super Bowls with the New England Patriots. The oldest person to be enshrined this year is Art McNally, who introduced instant replay to the NFL over a five-decade career as a referee and administrator.

Glenn has worked in radio newsrooms in Ashtabula, Toledo, Newark, OH and Cleveland.
Jay Shah is an aspiring broadcast journalist pursuing a Master of Arts in media and journalism at Kent State University. Jay’s student media career began as an undergraduate student at Old Westbury Web Radio (OWWR) of the State University of New York College at Old Westbury. She is passionate about raising community awareness on social justice, and environmental issues as well as local music and art. Her spare time involves attending local music showcases, experimenting with weird food combinations and painting. Jay wishes to use her journalistic abilities for providing a voice to the voiceless.